Owning An Electric Car Is Twice As Cheap As Owning A Gas Vehicle

ATTENTION
This content is recommended for 30~60 minute sessions. Note that tutors may not be familiar with the content. Make sure you consult with your tutor before using this material. 


Article

After a quick greeting, read the following article out loud. Your tutor will go over pronunciation if necessary.

[Flicker: Jakob Härter]


[P1] Electric cars are generally more expensive to buy than conventional vehicles. The suggested retail price for a 2018 Nissan Leaf, the world’s best selling EV, is about $30,000 in the U.S. You can pick up a new Honda Civic 2018 for less than $19,000 (though this excludes the still-available federal tax credit for new EVs, worth $7,500).

[P2] But running an EV is almost always cheaper–sometimes dramatically so. A new analysis shows EV costs are on average 2.3 times lower than for gasoline vehicles nationally, though the numbers vary a lot state to state. In Washington and Oregon, where electricity is relatively cheap, EV drivers have a third of the energy costs of conventional drivers.

[P3] The analysis comes from the University of Michigan’s Transportation Research Institute. It bases its figures on average electricity and gasoline prices in all 50 states at the end of 2017, plus the average fuel economy and electricity consumption of conventional and electric vehicles. It assumes a driving distance about 11,500 miles a year–the national average in 2015.

[P4] Drivers in Hawaii pay the most for gasoline ($1,509 a year), followed by Alaska ($1,434), California ($1,407), Washington ($1,338), and Oregon ($1,274). Motorists in Alabama, Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas, and South Carolina pay the least–all about $1,000 a year to cover the average driving distance.
EVs are cheapest to run in Louisiana ($367), followed by Washington ($372), Arkansas ($382), Idaho ($390), and Tennessee ($398). Hawaii ($1,106), Alaska ($833), Connecticut ($804), New Hampshire ($751), and Rhode Island ($737) have the highest electricity costs.

[P5] The report’s authors, Michael Sivak and Brandon Schoettle, also calculated the average fuel economy rate that conventional vehicles would need to reach to match EVs in each state. In Washington and Oregon, a gasoline car would need to go as high as 90 MPG and 77 MPG to make up the cost difference. Miles per gallon would need to be higher than 50 in 39 states. Under federal CAFE rules, new cars must exceed 45 MPG; the current national average for all cars, new and old, is about 25 MPG.

[P6] Of course, price is not the only consideration in whether to switch to electric, with vehicle range and driving experience often cited as barriers. But with battery prices falling all the time, range anxiety often more imaginary than justified, and many manufacturers announcing big electric car plans, such worries may soon be a thing of the past.

Vocabulary

Read the word/expression and definition out loud. Your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
conventional (adj) used and accepted by most people : usual or traditional
e.g. Today, many patients seek healing through both alternative medicine and conventional medicine.
retail (adj) relating to the business of selling things directly to customers for their own use
e.g. Is that price retail or wholesale?
tax credit (v) def3
e.g. example
anxiety (n) fear or nervousness about what might happen
e.g. He’s been feeling a lot of anxiety about/over his new job.
justify (v) to provide a good reason for the actions of (someone)
e.g. She was (perfectly/fully) justified in complaining to her boss. [=she had a good reason for complaining to her boss]

Discussion Questions

Use the following questions as a guideline to help develop an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  1. Summarize the article in your own words.
  2. Summarize the analysis in your own words. Try to incorporate as much figures as possible.
  3. How popular is EV in your country?
  4. What are other considerations people have when they purchase a car? Share your thoughts with your Cambly tutor!

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

What it’s like in Pyeongchang, South Korea — the host city of the 2018 Olympics

ATTENTION
This content is recommended for 30~60 minute sessions. Note that tutors may not be familiar with the content. Make sure you consult with your tutor before using this material. 


Article

After a quick greeting, read the following article out loud. Your tutor will go over pronunciation if necessary.

Kim Hong-Ji/Reuters 

[P1] South Korea’s Pyeongchang, host city of the 2018 Olympic Games, will welcome nearly one million athletes and spectators to its quiet slice of the Korean Peninsula in February.

[P2] The county of Pyeongchang is one of the safest places to live and visit across the globe — with one major catch. It sits only 50 miles from the border of North Korea, which has raised the prospect of war with a series of ballistic missile and nuclear weapons tests in recent months.

[P3] Stretched across rugged mountains and valleys, Pyeongchang covers an area roughly the size of Houston. More than 43,000 people live there, with many working in agriculture.

Here’s what it’s like to live in the host city of the 2018 Olympics.

  1. Pyeongchang (not to be confused with Pyongyang, the capital of North Korea) sits about the same distance from the border of North Korea and the capital of South Korea, Seoul.
  2. The area has an average elevation of approximately 700 meters above sea level, which gives it the nickname “the Alps of Korea.” Mountains cover more than 80% of the terrain.
  3. Pyeongchang is also one of the country’s coldest places. During winter, cold air comes down from Russia and chills the area to about 35 degrees Fahrenheit and below.
  4. At a recent concert held in the new Olympic Stadium, a 35,000-seat venue with no overhead cover or heating system, six people were stricken with hypothermia. January is the coldest month.
  5. Pyeongchang attracts winter revelers with its pristine skiing conditions. The largest resort, Alpensia Resort, has six slopes for skiing and snowboarding.
  6. Few people speak English, though the South Korean government has paid for English lessons for some people working in the service industry.
  7. Visitors hungry for Korean barbecue will find no shortage in Pyeongchang. But the local delicacies are dried pollack (fish) in stews and rice steamed with mountain herbs.
  8. People get around by bicycle, city bus, and car. High-speed trains built in time for the Olympic Games will carry visitors from Seoul to Pyeongchang in just over an hour.
  9. At Woljeongsa Temple, visitors can explore ancient Buddhist temples set in a national park. It was established in the year 643.
  10. The massive complex of temples and pagodas was destroyed during the Korean War and has since been rebuilt. Today, Woljeongsa Temple is one of Korea’s 10 national parks.
  11. In the mountain town of Daegwallyeong, visitors can tour a sheep farm, learn horse-riding, or try a cheese-making class. The sheep farm is often used as a set in Korean movies.
  12. Foreign hordes will descend on Pyeongchang starting in February for the 2018 Olympic Games. As of January, a reported 61% of the one million total tickets have sold.
  13. As the Olympics near, all eyes will be on South Korea — and its neighbor to the north.

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/photos-of-pyeongchang-south-korea-2018-winter-olympics-2018-1

Vocabulary

Read the word/expression and definition out loud. Your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
spectator (n) a person who watches an event, show, game, activity, etc., often as part of an audience
e.g. The spectators lining the road cheered the racers on.
rugged (adj) having a rough, uneven surface
e.g. the rugged surface of the moon
terrain (n) land of a particular kind
e.g. We had to drive over some rough terrain.
delicacy (n) a food that people like to eat because it is special or rare
e.g. The restaurant serves delicious sausages and other regional delicacies.
horde (n) a large group of people
e.g. A horde of tourists entered the museum.

Discussion Questions

Use the following questions as a guideline to help develop an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  1. Summarize the article in your own words.
  2. Are you excited about the Olympics? Is there a sports that you’ve been following?
  3. How are you going to participate in the event?
  4. Do you think hosting a global event like the Olympics help the local people? Share your thoughts with your Cambly tutor!

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Interview 37: A Challenge Or Conflict At Work

For the best result, make sure you have read this article and already have a write-up of your answer prior to your Cambly session. You can send a longer text to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system.

This following content has been modified from LiveCareer. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

What the Hiring Manager Is Really Asking…

This is actually one of the better interview questions asked, both for the interviewee and the interviewer, and there are a couple of reasons why:

  1. It’s a solid, basic, open-ended question that an interviewer can ask any candidate.
  2. When asked properly, the question can surprise candidates, as opposed to other questions which are easier to anticipate and prepare answers for.
  3. It allows the interviewer to get a handle on how a candidate responds in a situation that doesn’t have a clear, easy, yes-or-no answer.
  4. When an interviewer gets a handle on this, they then know how a candidate will most likely respond to unforeseen challenges and difficult situations in the role they’re interviewing for.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Why do you think it’s beneficial to talk about something that gave you trouble in an interview?
  • What do you think the interviewer is looking for in this question?

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

The Best Way to Respond

One straightforward way to respond to interview questions about difficult situations at work is to use the STAR technique.

  • Situation/Task: Describe the challenging situation/task that you needed to deal with.
  • Action: What action(s) did you take to remedy things? Be specific.
  • Results: What were the results of your action(s)? What would have happened if you hadn’t reacted that way?

While following this simple formula, you’ll also want to focus on aspects related to your reasoning, integrity, or initiative, or your ability to reach out to superiors when you don’t know the answer. For example:

  • Talking about an ethical dilemma in which you chose to act with integrity.
  • Discussing your initiative in tackling a difficult situation to a positive end.
  • Discussing how you worked through a dilemma and found a solution.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • What are the benefits of answering this question with the STAR technique?
  • Think of a few instances where you handled a difficult situation
  • Write a response for this using STAR

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Mistakes You Should Avoid

If you haven’t thought this question through ahead of time (and you really should), there’s a good chance that you may not be able to think of something off the top of your head. Here are some things to avoid speaking about when answering this question.

  • Don’t speak poorly of former or current companies or co-workers.
  • Don’t be self-focused to the point of discussing yourself in a superior light.
  • Avoid discussing your own shortcomings . . . unless you also mention your growth.
  • Don’t choose a situation that isn’t job-related unless you have no work experience.

Your potential employer wants to know that you can effectively work through a difficult situation on the job, so be sure to avoid a self-deprecating attitude. While people love self-deprecating humor in real life, the short time span of a job interview really isn’t the time for it. Take the question seriously, and answer it seriously.

If the interviewer asks about a situation you’ve never had to deal with, it’s okay to say so, but they can then easily change the question to “How WOULD you deal with a difficult situation like that?” In other words, they can switch from the historical to the hypothetical, which makes the question a lot harder all of a sudden.

With that in mind, the best follow-up response would be to say “That’s never happened to me, but if that kind of situation did come up, here’s how I would handle it . . . .” And from there, you apply the STAR technique.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • How did handling that situation make you a better employee?
  • Was there anything you felt that you could have improved upon? What steps have you taken to do so?
  • How does the way you handle difficult situations make you uniquely qualified for this job?

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Sample Answer

“During a summer session I had a student who was writing rude, offensive notes on student papers during peer grading assignments. I arranged a meeting with the student, and had my principal attend too, as a witness. I calmly yet firmly informed the student that the types of comments she was providing weren’t helpful—that they were in fact detrimental. From there, the three of us had a fruitful discussion on the types of comments that work best on student papers. In the end, the student walked away with a solid understanding of how to provide constructive, non-offensive feedback to other students.”

“Late one Friday afternoon at my last job, a client called with an urgent question about the project we were working on for them. My boss usually handles all client contact directly, but he had already left for the weekend. I explained the situation to the client, and said that although I might not know the exact answer to the question, that I was also working on the project and might be able to help. That was good enough for the client, and while it was true that I didn’t have the answer immediately, we were able to work through it together fairly quickly, and the client got off the call assured that they wouldn’t need to worry about the issue over the weekend. I also left a note for my boss about the call, so that he could check with the client on his return on Monday morning.”

PS: If you’re still struggling with getting calls back for interviews, LiveCareer can help. Put our resume builder or resume examples to use and craft a top-notch resume in no time at all. Also consider our cover letter builder if you’re stuck on how to best craft one that complements your resume.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Write the first draft of your answer with your tutor.
  • Are there any words or phrases that you are not comfortable pronouncing?
  • Now rehearse with your tutor until you are comfortable answering the question without the script.

Interview 36: What Motivates You?

For the best result, make sure you have read this article and already have a write-up of your answer prior to your Cambly session. You can send a longer text to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system.

This following content has been modified from LiveCareer. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

What the Hiring Manager Is Really Asking…

Even the simplest interview questions usually have some hidden meaning behind them. The information the interviewer is trying to uncover is not always apparent, but if you are able to recognize what they are really asking, your answers will benefit you in the interview.

There are few questions simpler than, “What motivates you?”. Yet this deceptively simple question has some hidden meaning. The specifics of how you are motivated are not important; the interviewer is interested in whether you are able to motivate yourself. They want to make sure that you will be able to work without a manager’s supervision if you are hired.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Why is there a distinction between how you are motivated, and if you can motivate yourself? Why does an employer care about this?
  • Think of a time when you have been particularly motivated in the past.
  • What led you to be so motivated?

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Points to Emphasize

Because the specifics are less important, there are many ways to answer this question. The following points should help you nail down what really matters.

  • Communicate that you are self-motivated. It is important that you are able to perform on your own. It is beneficial to the company if managers do not have to make an effort to motivate the employees.
  • Be honest and sincere. Think about what actually motivates you. There are many acceptable answers, as long as it translates to hard work, but you should never make something up.
  • Be specific. Do not just say you are self motivated. You should point to success, satisfaction, or some other specific aspect as your source of motivation.
  • Be optimistic. A positive attitude creates a good impression.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • What strategies have you used to motivate yourself in the past?
  • Why are these strategies effective, and how would you bring them with you into this new work environment?
  • How do help motivate those around you?

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Mistakes You Should Avoid

You should choose your words carefully to avoid the interviewer thinking you are not motivated to work with them. Avoid these common mistakes.

  • Do not rush. Not giving your answer enough time makes it seem like you are not motivated.
  • Do not embellish your answer. It is not expected that you are totally motivated 100% of the time. You should just be able to always do your job properly.
  • You should not get your motivation from others. It is best if an employee can be responsible for their own motivation.
  • Do not choose your personal goals as your source of motivation, unless these goals are to communicate that you will work hard.

It may be acceptable if your motivation comes from advancing in the company.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Decide on one or two points to explain how you motivate yourself, and how you have used this skill effectively in the past
  • Would you consider motivation a particular skill? If so, highlight it.

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Sample Answer

Your answer should incorporate specifics to the job you are applying for, but it may resemble this example.

“I am able to motivate myself. Instead of relying on managers or other superiors to encourage me, I find that achieving success drives me forward. The satisfaction I get from doing a job better than anyone around me keeps my work at a high level and my morale high, as well.”

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Write the first draft of your answer with your tutor.
  • Are there any words or phrases that you are not comfortable pronouncing?
  • Now rehearse with your tutor until you are comfortable answering the question without the script.

Interview 35: What Is Your Greatest Achievement Outside Of Work?

For the best result, make sure you have read this article and already have a write-up of your answer prior to your Cambly session. You can send a longer text to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system.

This following content has been modified from LiveCareer. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

What the Hiring Manager Is Really Asking…

When you go into a professional interview, the hiring manager may ask, “What is your greatest achievement outside of work” Interviewers ask this question because your response will reveal much about what motivates and inspires you. Hiring managers are not just interested in your resume. They want to find quality individuals that they can invest in and rely on. This question helps them find out if your mindset will work well with the company policies and your potential coworkers. View the achievement question as an opportunity to show your passion for personal growth and development.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Why do you think interviewers are looking for when they ask this question?
  • What do you consider milestones in your life? How did you manage to achieve them?
  • What key things have you learned from personal success?

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Points to Emphasize

When you recall a good memory, you will naturally relive the emotions you experienced when the event took place. This genuine response will shine through in the form of excitement. This real emotion is engaging, so don’t be afraid to let it show.

  • Choose something that you’ve done in the last 5 years.
  • Emphasize how the experience will help you be a good employee.
  • Include your motivation for accomplishing your goal.
  • Highlight qualities such as tenacity, focus and positive attitude.

Remember to stay positive and keep it professional. Even if your achievement was difficult, focus on the good to come out of the situation.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Was this achievement a personal accomplishment? How does it relate to your professional goals?
  • How did this achievement make you a better employee?
  • Think of five main qualities that contributed to this success

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Mistakes You Should Avoid

In retrospect, people remember how you make them think and feel as opposed to your exact words. Thus, it is very important to be honest about which past event is most important to you.

  • Do not pick a work place achievement.
  • Do not choose an event that took place more than 5 years ago.
  • Do not focus on the negatives from the road to your past accomplishment.
  • Do not tell an anecdote that did not actually happen in your life.

Always keep your response professional. You are sharing a personal experience, but remain cognizant of where you are and the type of details that are appropriate in such a setting.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • To keep things concise, decide on one or two main steps to highlight when recounting your path to success
  • What inspired you to pursue success? How will you bring that into the workplace?
  • What is it about your success story that makes you stand out?

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Sample Answer

Here is an example of a good answer to the greatest personal achievement question:

“In an effort to be healthier, I recently lost about 40 pounds and started training for a marathon. Over the past two years, I’ve changed everything from my diet to my hobbies. It was difficult initially, but now, I’m ready for my first marathon next month. I’ve never had a problem with accomplishing a goal, but now I know I intimately understand the power of determination.”

Remember, the hiring manager wants to find a good fit for the company, so don’t forget to sell what you bring to the company.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Write the first draft of your answer with your tutor.
  • Are there any words or phrases that you are not comfortable pronouncing?
  • Now rehearse with your tutor until you are comfortable answering the question without the script.

Interview 34: Describe An Important Project You Worked On

For the best result, make sure you have read this article and already have a write-up of your answer prior to your Cambly session. You can send a longer text to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system.

This following content has been modified from LiveCareer. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

What the Hiring Manager Is Really Asking…

One of the most common competency-based questions for any role requiring some project management experience is “Describe an important project you’ve worked on.” There are a few reasons why interviewers ask this question. They want to see how well you can manage a project or a situation, what your approach to dealing with challenges is, and how your skills would help you to successfully lead a project. They also want to know what your work ethic is like, and gain insight into how you handle stress. So how are you going to answer this question?

First, you need to prepare an answer in advance. It’s very hard to give a well thought-out, five-star answer if you haven’t done prep before your interview. To get started with prepping a response to this interview question, write out a list of all the important projects you’ve worked on in your career. Then, note what the goal was of each project, and what part you played in bringing each project across the finish line. Then, note the outcomes of all the projects.

The next step is to hone in on the project (or projects) you’ll discuss in an interview situation. Use the STAR method (Situation, Task, Action, Result) to create a concise (yet thorough) answer. Make sure your answer demonstrates your abilities with setting priorities, making decisions, hitting deadlines, and delegating tasks (if you’ve been in a management role). Below are some points to consider when preparing your answer.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Why do you think the STAR method is an effective way to answer this question?
  • Of these items, which do you think is most important to highlight in the interview? What do you think the employer is most looking for?

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Choose the Right Example

Select a project you’ve worked on recently, and not one from several years ago. One of my coaching clients who was applying for a managing director role told me about an impressive achievement during a mock interview. When I asked him when the achievement took place, he said 10 years ago (!). It’s important that you focus on something more recent—you don’t want to give the impression that the last significant achievement in your career took place eons ago.

Also, make sure you pick a project that was actually successful (unless you want to talk about an unsuccessful project that you turned around and made a success). You don’t want to rattle off a bad example in an interview! I’ve heard many stories of candidates realizing halfway through their answer that they’ve chosen a bad example, and that the outcome they worked towards in the interview situation was actually a disastrous one.

Ideally, pick an example that’s most relevant to the responsibilities of the job you’re applying for.

Explain Your Role Clearly and Talk Tangible Outcomes

A common mistake that candidates make is saying “we” all the time when answering a question about an important project. It is okay to say “we” if you’ve managed a team, but make sure that you make your contribution to the project clear. What role did you play in its success? That’s what you need to emphasize.

Also, make sure you mention the tangible result of the project. If the work you did saved the company time or money, or took it to a new level in regards to its standing amongst competitors, well . . . go ahead and quantify your answer as much as possible! And if you earned rave reviews from a client, be sure to note their specific feedback. It’s also a good idea to mention what you learned from the project—both from the success and its challenges.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • What things are you most proud of in the projects that you’ve worked on?
  • What steps did you take that specifically helped the outcome of a successful project?
  • How would you bring these skills to this company? What is it about your leadership ability that helps you stand out?

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Mistakes You Should Avoid

It can be easy to begin rambling about an important project or achievement from a current or previous position when in an interview situation. Stay clear and concise by avoiding these mistakes and pitfalls. Do not go into an interview situation without an answer to this question firmly planted in your head. As noted at the beginning of the article, you should write out a list of all the important projects you’ve worked on in your career, and detail how you contributed to their successful completions. Choose a past project that aligns with the job/industry you’re interviewing for.

Share your success, but avoid coming off as arrogant when you do so. Don’t focus on the contribution of others—the answer you provide should primarily be about you. Also, don’t focus on negatives, or talk about how you disliked the important project (if that is indeed the case).

Again, avoid talking about an unsuccessful project (unless—as previously mentioned—you want to talk about how you turned an unsuccessful project into a successful one).

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Why do you think it is important to find a balance between arrogance and confidence? What are some ways you can avoid seeming arrogant?
  • Apply the STAR method to a project that you think fits best with this interview you’re preparing for.
  • Why is this the project that you’re choosing?

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Sample Answer

“I have worked on many important projects throughout my career. What’s really crucial for me when starting one is to get very clear on the goals right at the start and then create a plan with milestones. I also like dealing with the most difficult parts of the projects early on—that way in case there are any significant issues, I’ll still have a nice amount of time to complete before the deadline. I also typically break down large tasks into smaller chunks, so that it is easier to know where to start. Detailed planning is very important to ensure an important project goes smoothly. For example, last year I was in charge of . . . .”

From here, start explaining the project, first in terms of its purpose and objective, scope, complexity [e.g. working with new technology, number of resources, budget, and timeline] and the key challenge you needed to overcome. Show them that you can see not only the big picture but also all the little things that need to happen on a daily basis in order to get the project done.

Here’s another example of how to answer the question:

“In order to get project “X” completed in my previous job, I found out who the key stakeholders were and got their input on the project’s different parts. Then, I outlined the major milestones that would be involved in completing the project, and worked backwards to break down the work that would need to be done at each stage.

I created a list of all possible risks that might stop us from reaching those milestones, and I then added some extra time to the schedule in case anything unexpected came up. I also made sure that my role and responsibilities in the project were as clear as possible so I knew exactly what I had to do. The project was completed on time, but looking back, I realize there were some problems that could have been avoided. For example, I would have changed “Z” in order to avoid some of the minor scheduling problems we ran into. Having said that, it’s always easier to see what the learnings are after a project has been completed, and I now know what I’d do differently the next time.”

Remember your end goal with this question: to put yourself in the best possible light when explain your project management approach, and lessons learned from past important projects. Make sure you shine in the end, but don’t come off as an arrogant bragger. Don’t take all the credit if you worked on a collaborative project. Quantify the end results, if possible, and always make sure you share the outcome of the project’s completion. Good luck!

PS: If you’re still struggling with getting calls back for interviews, LiveCareer can help. Put our resume builder or resume examples to use and craft a top-notch resume in no time at all. And if you’re having a tough time with writing cover letters, check out our cover letter builder as well!

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Write the first draft of your answer with your tutor.
  • Are there any words or phrases that you are not comfortable pronouncing?
  • Now rehearse with your tutor until you are comfortable answering the question without the script.