LinkedIn Profile: Part 3

Before the lesson, make sure you have sent the link to your LinkedIn profile to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system. You can send an attachment by clicking the following button when you are logged on to Cambly’s website.

If you don’t have a LinkedIn profile already, please create one before the session:

This following content has been modified from Big Interview. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

LinkedIn Experience Section Example

Hugo Pereira is a Brussels-based marketing professional who successfully used LinkedIn to fast-track his last two job searches. See below for the job description of a previous role that helped him land his current gig. Note the focus on accomplishments (not just job duties) and the embedded recommendations and visual examples of his past work.

Remember: Your primary goal is to be found by employers and HR personnel interested in people with your unique experience and talent. Use the words they’ll be looking for when describing your industry experience.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Why do you need a well-crafted LinkedIn profile?
  • Make sure you created a profile already and shared the link with your tutor.

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Part 2: Your LinkedIn Connections

The next important aspect of your LinkedIn profile is connecting to the people you know and the people you want to know.

LinkedIn Connections – How Does Your Network Grow?

Connections are a huge part of what makes LinkedIn such a force and invaluable tool for good to people searching for jobs.

Why are connections so critical on LinkedIn?

It’s not just the first-level connections that are critical. It’s the additional connections you can make because of those people who know you and (hopefully) love you.

Your primary connections serve as introductions to the people they know – to people and opportunities around the world and across industries.

Earlier, I shared the LinkedIn profile summary of Steven Burda — he may be the most connected man on all of LinkedIn and it shows. He has hundreds of recommendations and references in a broad range of categories and countless endorsements of his skills.

Of course, there are some potential employers, who look for those vital connections as a sign of credibility.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Why are connections so critical on LinkedIn?
  • How many connections can you find? Try brainstorming who you can connect with with your tutor.

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Sidebar: The Recruiter’s Perspective

John Paul Engel is the president of a recruiting firm that serves high-growth companies in cable, payments, and professional and financial services.

He kindly shared his thoughts on what gets his attention (positively and negatively) when he’s scouting for talent on LinkedIn.

Turn-ons:

  1. Keywords related to the job. (In particular, listing software names (e.g. Omniture, Tableau) makes it easier to find your profile for related positions)
  2. Measurable accomplishments. (Give me dollar estimates and/or other hard numbers!)
  3. Well-written copy
  4. Complete profiles (Fill out the details under education and job entries.)
  5. Key accomplishments that make you stand out
  6. Lots of connections – particularly if we share some
  7. Great recommendations from executives

Turn-offs:

  1. Goofy picture (You posing in your muscle shirt next to Donald Duck)
  2. Weird jobs or job descriptions (Chairman of the Chocolate Factory, CEO of the Smith Family)
  3. Key information missing
  4. Single-digit connection list
  5. Recommendations only from very junior-level connections

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Do you have keywords related to the job?
  • Do you have measurable accomplishments?
  • Did you complete your profile with key accomplishments?
  • Do you have any list from turn-offs that apply to your account? How can you improve?

LinkedIn Profile: Part 2

Before the lesson, make sure you have sent the link to your LinkedIn profile to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system. You can send an attachment by clicking the following button when you are logged on to Cambly’s website.

If you don’t have a LinkedIn profile already, please create one before the session:

This following content has been modified from Big Interview. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

URL Customization

Customizing your LinkedIn URL makes it easier for people to find you by searching for your name. Otherwise, they’re left sifting through the hundreds of LinkedIn visitors who have names similar to yours when looking for you.

Most users have some combination of name and several numbers as a default URL. You want to shorten that to your first and last name if possible. If your ideal custom url is already taken, look for a memorable combination of initials and last name, throw in your middle name, or otherwise get creative so that people will be able to find you easily.

Why is this step important?

Aside from making you easier to find by people who are looking for you, this also allows you to develop continuity between social media accounts such as Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, and even your blog – assuming you have one. These are all places prospective employers are likely to visit trying to learn a little more about the person behind the profile.

Fortunately, the process to personalize your LinkedIn URL is simple. It takes less than a minute, so stop what you’re doing and customize your LinkedIn URL now. (Yes, this means you too, Mark Cuban.)

Here’s how to personalize your LinkedIn URL:

  1. Hover your mouse over the word profile running across the top bar.
  2. Look for edit profile. Click.
  3. Look in the light gray box beneath your profile picture. There you will find the link to your LinkedIn url followed by an edit button. Click the edit button.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Customize your LinkedIn profile URL with your tutor.

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Make Your Summary the Focal Point of Your Profile

Just like the summary on the resume, the summary on your LinkedIn profile really gives users like you an opportunity to shine. This is your space to differentiate yourself from all the other computer programmers, accountants, marketers, and other professionals in the job market today.

LinkedIn allows users to include images in profiles. Use this ability to your advantage by including pictures whenever the occasion makes it possible to do so.

Helpful Hint: Include videos of relevant presentations you’ve conducted or images/videos of your proudest work. Photojournalists may want to include their favorite shots, bakers can feature photos of wedding cakes or cupcakes that have earned accolades from satisfied customers, etc.


LinkedIn Profile Summary Example 1

As an example, let’s take a look at the very comprehensive profile summary of Steven Burda, the self-proclaimed most connected man on all of LinkedIn.

Note that Burda includes both a short and long summary. He also used his summary to showcase his experience by adding a multimedia component via a slideshow.

You don’t have to be as ambitious as Burda, but look to his example for inspiration regarding some of the elements that you could include in your own summary.

Your Experience, Skills, and Expertise are More Than the Sum of Their Parts

Resist the temptation to cut and paste your resume into the experience column of your LinkedIn profile. Try to use words in this section to paint a revealing portrait of the skills and talents you possess.
This section is much more than a description of previous jobs. Keep this section of your profile easy for readers to scan quickly, but also make an effort to showcase your accomplishments, talents, and accolades in a compelling manner.

LinkedIn also allows you to bring your descriptions to life with images, videos, recommendations, and other compelling extras.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Discuss what you want to include in your summary with your tutor.
  • Write a first draft of your summary either on your own or with your tutor.
  • Come back again to revise your writing.

LinkedIn Profile: Part 1

Before the lesson, make sure you have sent the link to your LinkedIn profile to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system. You can send an attachment by clicking the following button when you are logged on to Cambly’s website.

If you don’t have a LinkedIn profile already, please create one before the session:

This following content has been modified from Big Interview. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

The majority of hiring companies rely on social media for finding and researching job candidates, according to the latest surveys. For example, recruitment platform Jobvite found that 94% of U.S. companies perform social recruiting.

And where is that social recruiting happening? Most of it is going down on LinkedIn – 94% of the Jobvite survey respondents named LinkedIn as their dominant recruiting network.

What do these numbers mean to you, the job seeker?

It means you need to get your LinkedIn profile in order, and right quick.

A well-crafted LinkedIn profile allows you to provide something that no resume or cover letter can. It lets you showcase yourself in multiple dimensions, to paint a picture of yourself as a whole person, instead of just the typical resume’s collection of dates and buzzwords.

This LinkedIn Profile guide will give you the information you need to create the perfect LinkedIn profile to make an outstanding first impression with recruiters and potential employers – while also helping you build your professional brand and expand your professional network in general.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Why do you need a well-crafted LinkedIn profile?
  • Make sure you created a profile already and shared the link with your tutor.

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Setting Up Your LinkedIn Profile for Maximum Results

If you’re not active on LinkedIn (or if you just haven’t gotten around to optimizing, expanding, or updating your profile in a while…or ever), it can be difficult to know where to start in your efforts to turn your basic profile into an opportunity magnet.

This guide will walk you through the key elements of an effective LinkedIn profile and best practices for getting noticed. Future posts will cover more advanced techniques.

One note to keep in mind: Details are critical. It is important to pay attention to the little things, such as spelling and grammar, throughout your profile. I’ve seen great profiles undermined by typos and minor errors.


What’s in a Name?

When it comes to your name, it’s best to keep it plain and simple. More importantly, it makes it easier for potential employers to find your profile.

Resist the temptation to include things like Killer Video Game Programmer or Tax Shredding CPA for SEO as far as your name goes, and stick to the basics – first and last name. It makes more sense to wait to highlight your brand/strengths in your headline.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Check you have first and last name in English.

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Headline Design for Success

Your headline is one of the most important portions of your LinkedIn profile. Not only is it an excellent place to include critical career-minded keywords, but it will show up frequently throughout key LinkedIn locations such as:

  • Search Results
  • Connection Invitations
  • Employee Listings
  • Company Pages
  • Messages

This is the place where you can use some superlatives and creative wordsmithing in order to attract attention. You want to keep it professional, but this is an important opportunity to make yourself memorable. Don’t squander it.

At its heart and soul, LinkedIn is another search engine. Whatever you choose to make your headline say, make it something searchable that will help people who are looking for the services you provide or the particular skill set you bring to the table find you.

Just take a look at the keyword laden, yet memorable LinkedIn headline for John Paul Engel.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Discuss what kind of keywords you can use in the headline with your Cambly tutor.
  • Revise your headline according to the guideline.

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

The Right Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

Your photograph is a visual representation of who you are to the world of LinkedIn. Don’t go with a grainy ten-year-old summer vacation photograph. Your best bet is to use a professional-looking headshot. Depending on your profession and your intended audience, you can also opt for something more approachable and casual (but still professional).

According to Business Insider, people remember faces better than they remember names – that’s why headshots are preferable.

See the section below for two examples of profile photos. Mark Cuban’s photo definitely has personality and works great if you’re Mark Cuban. The average job seeker will probably do better with a photo like Tatiana’s, which is both friendly and professional.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Do you have the right headshot? If not, find an appropriate photo to replace.

Cover Letter: Part 3

Before the lesson, make sure you have sent your resume to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system. You can send an attachment by clicking the following button when you are logged on to Cambly’s website.

If you are not familiar with how to write a cover letter in English, you can download the following template as a guideline:

This following content has been modified from ResumeGenius. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Aside from the content on the page, the actual look and feel of the document is also an important aspect of the your letter. Elements such as margins, font size and style, and alignment all factor in to the hiring manager’s overall impression of you.

Here are a few quick tips when styling your own:

  1. 1” – 1.5” margins are always a safe bet. If you are having trouble fitting everything on one page, there is some wiggle room, but be careful not to make the content look crammed together.
  2. Don’t go below a 12-point font unless absolutely necessary. Anything below 12 can strain the eyes.
  3. Font style is really a matter of preference. Try to choose one that looks professional or that matches what the employer uses on their website. Keep in mind that different styles will change the size of the font.
  4. Maintain a uniform alignment throughout. We suggest keeping all paragraphs left-aligned.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Is your cover letter following the guideline?
  • If not, revise according to the guideline.

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Red Flags

I have “Red Flags” in my work or personal history — should I address them in my Cover Letter?

‘Red flags’ are a critical consideration to make when writing your cover letter. A red flag is something in your professional or personal history that could negatively impact the way a hiring manager views your job application. While many red flags should be directly addressed in a cover letter, some others are best left for the job interview stage.

The following list is of 8 of the biggest cover letter red flags. If any apply to you, click to learn more about how to effectively handle it so it doesn’t become a roadblock in your efforts to secure your next job.

  1. I want a career change/ I’ve job hopped in the past
  2. I need to relocate for the job
  3. I have gaps in employment on my resume
  4. I was terminated from a previous job
  5. I’ve been laid off before
  6. I was previously self-employed
  7. I have a medical issues/disability
  8. I have a criminal history

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Do you have any red flags that you want to address? Click the links to do further reading, then revise your cover letter with your Cambly tutor.

Cover Letter: Part 1

Before the lesson, make sure you have sent your resume to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system. You can send an attachment by clicking the following button when you are logged on to Cambly’s website.

If you are not familiar with how to write a cover letter in English, you can download the following template as a guideline:

This following content has been modified from ResumeGenius. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Cover letters are one page documents that you send with your resume when applying for a job. It is meant to:

  1. Introduce yourself to the hiring manager
  2. Argue why you’d be a good fit for the job
  3. Fill in places your resume cannot describe
  4. Further explain other aspects of your resume

By hitting those 4 aspects, your letter can be a convincing and powerful companion to a well-written resume.


Content Format Guide: 4 Steps

1. Contact Information

To begin, include both the employer’s and your contact information. See the example below:

While the example above demonstrates the information you need to include in the section, there are various ways to format it. Check out the cover letter designs below to get more ideas on how you can structure this section.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Is your contact information following the guideline?
  • If not, revise according to the guideline.

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

2. Introduction

Find out to whom you’re writing

Put yourself in the hiring manager’s shoes for a second. Would you like to be addressed as “Dear Sir or Madame?” or “To whom it may concern?”

“Dear Sir or Madame” makes you sound like you’re from the year 1865, and “to whom it may concern” is very irritating to hiring managers.

You can easily avoid this problem by doing your research. Look through the company’s website, LinkedIn, or even give the company a call to ask for the hiring manager’s name. Even if you get it wrong, it still looks like you’ve made an effort.

Introduce yourself

In the first paragraph, begin by telling the employer the position you are applying for and how you learned about the opportunity.

The rest of this paragraph should briefly present basic info about yourself, including: degree, area of study/expertise, and your career goals in terms of how they align with the goals of the company.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Who are you writing to?
  • What is the name of the hiring manager for the company you are trying to apply to?
  • Are you being clear about which position you are applying to?
  • Are you being clear and concise about the basic information about yourself?
  • Revise your introduction with your Cambly tutor.

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

3. Sell Yourself

The second paragraph should respond directly to the job description written by the hiring manager. Describe how your previous job experiences, skills, and abilities will allow you to meet the company’s needs. To make that easier, you can (and should) literally include words and phrases from the job description in your cover letters.

To go the extra mile, do some research about the company, and try to find out what they are doing — and why — given the current state of their industry. In a third paragraph, explain how you can fit into that schema, and help push the company forward and achieve any goals you suspect they may have.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Discuss which format suits your current situation and goals.
  • Choose the format from the 3 mentioned above.
  • Reorganize the information in your resume.
  • Make sure you have finished this step before moving onto Part 2.

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

4. Conclusion

The final paragraph is called the “call to action.” Inform them that you’d love to get interviewed. Tell them that you’ll be in contact with them in a week if you don’t hear back. Thank them for spending the time to read your letter.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Discuss which format suits your current situation and goals.
  • Choose the format from the 3 mentioned above.
  • Reorganize the information in your resume.
  • Make sure you have finished this step before moving onto Part 2.

Cover Letter: Part 2

Before the lesson, make sure you have sent your resume to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system. You can send an attachment by clicking the following button when you are logged on to Cambly’s website.

If you are not familiar with how to write a cover letter in English, you can download the following template as a guideline:

This following content has been modified from ResumeGenius. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

3. Sell Yourself

The second paragraph should respond directly to the job description written by the hiring manager. Describe how your previous job experiences, skills, and abilities will allow you to meet the company’s needs. To make that easier, you can (and should) literally include words and phrases from the job description in your cover letters.

To go the extra mile, do some research about the company, and try to find out what they are doing — and why — given the current state of their industry. In a third paragraph, explain how you can fit into that schema, and help push the company forward and achieve any goals you suspect they may have.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Discuss what kind of position and company you are applying to.
  • Are you describing the write job experiences, skills, and abilities that fit the opportunity you are applying to?
  • Did you include words and phrases from the job descriptions?
  • Do a little bit of research about the company. What did you find?
  • Revise your second and third paragraph according to the guideline with your Cambly tutor.

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

4. Conclusion

The final paragraph is called the “call to action.” Inform them that you’d love to get interviewed. Tell them that you’ll be in contact with them in a week if you don’t hear back. Thank them for spending the time to read your letter.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • What are your “call to action”?
  • Did you include that 1) you want an interview, 2) you’ll be in contact if you don’t hear back, and 3) you thank them for their time?
  • Revise your conclusion according to the guideline with your Cambly tutor.

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Last but not least..

It’s important that you go over your cover letter several times to improve its content and writing. Also, don’t forget to constantly revise as you apply to different companies and positions.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Read over your completed cover letter and make sure you don’t have any grammar errors or typos.
  • Revise your cover letter as you apply to different companies and positions.

2-44. If you had called me, I could’ve picked you up

insert image here (ratio 2:1 if possible)

Warm-up

Repeat after the tutor. 

  • If I had had money, I would’ve helped you.
  • If you had hurt me, I would’ve punched you.
  • If he had stayed here, he wouldn’t have died.
  • If you had come to the cafe, you could’ve seen Brad Pitt.
  • If he had protected me, I could’ve been safe.
  • If he hadn’t taught me, I couldn’t have mastered English.
  • If I hadn’t called her, she would’ve been late.
  • If we hadn’t been tired, we wouldn’t have slept.
  • If you hadn’t helped us, we couldn’t have finished this.
  • If I hadn’t studied hard, I couldn’t have passed this test.
  • If I had had money, I would’ve bought this boat.
  • If you had touched my dog, I would’ve yelled at you.
  • If she had had time, she would’ve helped us.
  • If you had promoted me, I would’ve been happy.
  • If he had fired us, we would’ve been sad.

Notes

Here are some grammar tips. 

Vocabulary

Go over the following vocabulary and expressions with your tutor. Use the illustration above if needed.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
bone (n) any one of the hard pieces that form the frame (called a skeleton) inside a person’s or animal’s body
e.g. If you weren’t safe, you couldn’t broken a bone
contention (n) something (such as a belief, opinion, or idea) that is argued or stated
e.g. If you had found new evidence, this would’ve resolved the contention in the family. 
come as (phrasal verb) used to describe the effect that something has when people first learn about it
e.g. If you didn’t tell me about the party, it would have came as a surprise to me.
debate (n) a discussion between people in which they express different opinions about something
e.g. If you had missed school, you would’ve missed watching the big debate between them. 
disagreement (n) failure to agree
e.g. If you didn’t take my side, it would have been a big disagreement
defend (v) to fight in order to keep (someone or something) safe : to not allow a person or thing to hurt, damage, or destroy (someone or something)
e.g. If you hadn’t defended me, I could have been hurt. 
reflect (on) (v) to think carefully about something
e.g. If you had reflected on your decision for a bit longer, you would have seen that it was wrong. 
menagerie (n) a collection of animals kept especially to be shown to the public
e.g. If you have come to the zoo, you would have seen the menagerie of animals. 
opt (v) to choose one thing instead of another
e.g. If you had given me more options, I would’ve opted for blue candy.
gap (n) a space between two people or things
e.g. If you didn’t jump, you could have fallen in the big gap between the rocks. 

Exercise

Go over the following exercise with your tutors. 

  1. Make a sentence.
    1. touched / had / if / my / dog / you /, /would’ve / I / hit / you / .
    2. had / you / me / promoted / if / , / been / I / would’ve / happy / .
    3. again / they / if / tried / had / , / the / won / could’ve / they / game / .
    4. helped / I / if / her / hadn’t / , /the / she / test / failed / could’ve / .
    5. if / helped / you / hadn’t / I / , / your / couldn’t/   business / have / you / started / .
  2. Correct the following sentences. 
    1. If I had had money, I would’ve buy this boat. 
    2. If he had fired us, we would’ve sad.
    3. If you had came to my party, you could’ve seen the singer.
    4. If I had find a job, I wouldn’t have come back.
    5. If I hadn’t met Master Eugene, I didn’t have mastered English.
  3. Answer the following questions.
    1. What is the biggest disagreement you have had with someone? 
    2. Have you ever broken a bone? 
    3. What is your favorite animal to see at the zoo? 
  4. (Homework) Write a paragraph.
    1. Write 10 sentences using the grammar you learned today.
    2. Bone of contention: Pick a contentious issue about which you care deeply — it could be the same-sex marriage debate, or just a disagreement you’re having with a friend. Write a post defending the opposite position, and then reflect on what it was like to do that.
    3. Menagerie: Do you have animals in your life? If yes, what do they mean to you? If no, why have you opted not to?

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.