Saving Money

Many bundles of US dollars bank notes

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Is it better to enjoy your money when you earn it or is it better to save your money for some time in the future? Use specific reasons and examples to support your opinion.
    • What are the benefits of saving money?
    • What are the benefits of enjoying your money when you earn it?
    • Is there a balance of enjoying and saving money?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
stockpile (n) large accumulation
Rather than investing he kept a stockpile of resources.
percentage (n) a proportion of a larger sum
She wondered what percentage she could save and still pay the bills.
frugal (adj) sparing or economical with money
By using coupons and finding sales, she was frugal with her money.
lavish (adj) very generous or extravagant
Their lavish grandmother always brought them presents.
conserve (v) prevent the harmful waste or overuse of a resource
She kept a portion of her paycheck to conserve and save for the future.
splurge (v) spend money freely
He decided to splurge on a new bike.
split up (expression) separate into sections
What’s the best way to split up a paycheck?
divvy out (expression) divide, share
The manager had to divvy out the holiday bonuses to the employees.
file away (expression) put away for storage
She filed away her checks before she could spend them.
break the bank (expression) use up all your money
The new house renovations were close to breaking the bank for the couple.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“If you must have motivation, think of your paycheck on Friday.”
― Noel Coward

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Lifelong Employment

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Businesses should hire employees for their entire lives. Do you agree or disagree? Use specific reasons and examples to support your answer.
    • What are the benefits of hiring employees for their entire lives?
    • What are some negative aspects of hiring employees for their entire lives?
    • What kind of company would you want to work at for your entire life?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
career (n) occupation undertaken for a significant period of time
She had so many careers at one time.
salary (n) fixed payment, wages
He was pleased with the salary that came with the position.
lifelong (adj) lasting or remaining in a particular state throughout a person’s life
She wanted this job to be part of her lifelong career.
stable (adj) not likely to give way
She wanted to work in a stable job where she knew what was expected of her.
affect (v) make a difference
Wherever you work, you can affect positive change.
master (v) acquire complete skill of something
With practice, they could eventually master the process.
bump up (expression) increase
He asked his manager to bump up his wages.
check off (expression) mark something in a list as done
After that experience, she could check off swimming with dolphins on her list.
decide on (expression) choose, select
She couldn’t decide on which career path to take.
work for peanuts (expression) labor for very little money
He felt underappreciated as he worked for peanuts every day.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“Without hard work, nothing grows but weeds.”
― Gordon Hinckley

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Taking Risks vs. Careful Planning

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Some people believe that success in life comes from taking risks or chances. Others believe that success results from careful planning. In your opinion, what does success come from? Use specific reasons and examples to support your answer.
    • In what situations is taking risks a good thing to do?
    • In what situations is careful planning a good thing to do?
    • What method tends to have the best results?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have a 15-minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
provision (n) a thing or amount supplied
We were thankful we had enough provisions to last the weekend.
chance (n) a possibility of something happening
She was afraid that there was a chance of rain.
strategic (adj) referring to long-term goals
He had to be strategic in how he made his next move in their chess game.
precarious (adj) not securely held or positioned
She was in a precarious spot where she had to decide what to do with her money.
jeopardize (v) put something at risk of danger
He asked her not to jeopardize the potential sale.
arrange (v) put in an efficient order
She wanted to arrange her day based on when she could get outside the most.
be after (expression) try to get or find
He always seemed to be after the next goal before the first one finished.
buy into (expression) accept an idea
They had to convince their teacher to buy into their new idea.
feel up to (expression) capable of doing something
He’ll only go if he felt up to driving for several hours.
run the risk (expression) subject oneself to potential danger
Turning the lights off will run the risk of people bumping into each other.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“Be brave. Take risks. Nothing can substitute experience.”
― Paulo Coelho

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Judge a Book by Its Cover

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Do you agree or disagree with the following statement? One should never judge a person by external appearances. Use specific reasons and details to support your answer.
    • In what ways do people judge others by their external appearance?
    • How can those situations have a negative impact?
    • In what ways does judging a person by their external appearance have value?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have a 15-minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
prejudice (n) preconceived opinion not based on the fact
She formed a prejudice against him without getting to know him.
appearance (n) the way someone looks
She loved her own appearance so much that she carried a mirror around with her at all times.
external (adj) belonging to the outer surface
They didn’t go in because of the ugly external walls of the building.
shallow (adj) not using serious thought
Since he never put forth an effort, they considered him to be shallow.
conclude (v) arrive at a decision
You need to know the facts before you can conclude something.
predispose (v) make someone inclined to a particular behavior
She was predisposed to like him since he was so nice to her.
frighten away (expression) scare someone off
His grumpiness frightened away the children.
give off (expression) behave in a way that makes others think of you in a certain way
She gave off an unpleasant character of being too uptight.
hold over (expression) have a grudge against someone
She wanted to hold over his previous comments on him.
deck out (expression) dress or decorate in a special way
With the party that evening, the ballroom was decked out in the most beautiful flowers.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“Outer beauty pleases the eye. Inner beauty captivates the heart.”
― Mandy Hale

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Live Performance vs. TV

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Do you agree or disagree with the following statement? Attending a live performance (for example, a play, concert, or sporting event) is more enjoyable than watching the same event on television. Use specific reasons and examples to support your opinion.
    • In what ways is a live performance enjoyable?
    • In what ways is an event on television enjoyable?
    • What events are better viewing in each method?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have a 15-minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
showing (n) performance of a specialized quality
There were so many movie showings to choose from.
rendition (n) performance or interpretation
The dancer did her own rendition of the famous scene.
live (adj) at a particular performance, not a recording
She preferred to watch live performances rather than the movie version.
captivating (adj) capable of attracting and holding attention
She thought the movie was captivating and suspenseful.
perform (v) present to an audience
He loved to perform in front of people.
engage (v) occupy or attract someone’s attention
The actor’s job was to engage the audience.
lighten up (expression) be less serious
There was a lot of comedy to lighten up the dramatic scenes.
move along (expression) develop or progress
The drama had to move along at an interesting pace.
nod off (expression) fall asleep
The performance wasn’t interesting so he began to nod off.
be in the limelight (expression) the center of attention
She was so dramatic that she enjoyed being in the limelight with everyone watching her.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“We aren’t in an information age. We’re in an entertainment age.”
― Tony Robbins

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Learning about Past

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Learning about the past has no value for those of us living in the present. Do you agree or disagree? Use specific reasons and examples to support your answer.
    • In what ways would learning about the past have value?
    • In what ways would learning about the past not have value?
    • Describe a time when you learned something about the past.

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
background (n) situations of a previous time
She had to explain her educational background in the interview.
past (n) a previous time or era
What kind of past did she have?
thoughtful (adj) showing consideration for others
He was so thoughtful in how he treated his younger siblings.
valuable (adj) of great worth or significance
Experiences are very valuable things to learn from.
reflect (v) think carefully or deeply about
Take a minute to reflect on your journey thus far.
experience (v) encounter or undergo
She wanted to experience all that she could during her trip.
mull over (expression) think about extensively
Could I mull over my answers a little longer?
own up (expression) admit to
He asked her to own up to her mistakes.
read up on (expression) research
She wanted to read up on the history of her city.
draw a blank (expression) get no response from a question
He drew a blank and didn’t know what the correct answer was. 

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.”
― Soren Kierkeggard

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Is Progress Good?

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Do you agree or disagree that progress is always good? Use specific reasons and examples to support your answer.
    • In what ways does progress benefit you?
    • In what ways does progress not benefit you?
    • What are some examples from history that support your point?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
progress (n) forward or onward movement
She wondered if progress was always a good thing in making things better.
hurdle (n) obstacle or hindrance
Although they faced several hurdles during their long project, they finally succeeded.
innovative (adj) featuring new methods
The kids were so innovative in their new creations.
constructive (adj) serving a purpose
She was always willing to receive constructive criticism to become better at what she was doing.
advance (v) move forward in a purposeful way
They asked her to advance their project to the next level.
experiment (v) try something out to determine a conclusion
He had to experiment with several outcomes.
try out (expression) attempt to do something
We had to try out several solutions before we found one that worked.
rise above (expression) not be affected by something negative
She knew she could rise above any challenge she faced.
sign on (expression) agree to participate
Although he was reluctant to join, he finally decided to sign on to the project.
cover a lot of ground (expression) get a lot of things done, learn a lot
With so much to learn, it’s important to cover a lot of ground during each session.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“A mind that is stretched by a new experience can never go back to its old dimensions.”
― Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.