Taking Risks vs. Careful Planning

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Some people believe that success in life comes from taking risks or chances. Others believe that success results from careful planning. In your opinion, what does success come from? Use specific reasons and examples to support your answer.
    • In what situations is taking risks a good thing to do?
    • In what situations is careful planning a good thing to do?
    • What method tends to have the best results?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have a 15-minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
provision (n) a thing or amount supplied
We were thankful we had enough provisions to last the weekend.
chance (n) a possibility of something happening
She was afraid that there was a chance of rain.
strategic (adj) referring to long-term goals
He had to be strategic in how he made his next move in their chess game.
precarious (adj) not securely held or positioned
She was in a precarious spot where she had to decide what to do with her money.
jeopardize (v) put something at risk of danger
He asked her not to jeopardize the potential sale.
arrange (v) put in an efficient order
She wanted to arrange her day based on when she could get outside the most.
be after (expression) try to get or find
He always seemed to be after the next goal before the first one finished.
buy into (expression) accept an idea
They had to convince their teacher to buy into their new idea.
feel up to (expression) capable of doing something
He’ll only go if he felt up to driving for several hours.
run the risk (expression) subject oneself to potential danger
Turning the lights off will run the risk of people bumping into each other.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“Be brave. Take risks. Nothing can substitute experience.”
― Paulo Coelho

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Judge a Book by Its Cover

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Do you agree or disagree with the following statement? One should never judge a person by external appearances. Use specific reasons and details to support your answer.
    • In what ways do people judge others by their external appearance?
    • How can those situations have a negative impact?
    • In what ways does judging a person by their external appearance have value?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have a 15-minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
prejudice (n) preconceived opinion not based on the fact
She formed a prejudice against him without getting to know him.
appearance (n) the way someone looks
She loved her own appearance so much that she carried a mirror around with her at all times.
external (adj) belonging to the outer surface
They didn’t go in because of the ugly external walls of the building.
shallow (adj) not using serious thought
Since he never put forth an effort, they considered him to be shallow.
conclude (v) arrive at a decision
You need to know the facts before you can conclude something.
predispose (v) make someone inclined to a particular behavior
She was predisposed to like him since he was so nice to her.
frighten away (expression) scare someone off
His grumpiness frightened away the children.
give off (expression) behave in a way that makes others think of you in a certain way
She gave off an unpleasant character of being too uptight.
hold over (expression) have a grudge against someone
She wanted to hold over his previous comments on him.
deck out (expression) dress or decorate in a special way
With the party that evening, the ballroom was decked out in the most beautiful flowers.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“Outer beauty pleases the eye. Inner beauty captivates the heart.”
― Mandy Hale

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Live Performance vs. TV

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Do you agree or disagree with the following statement? Attending a live performance (for example, a play, concert, or sporting event) is more enjoyable than watching the same event on television. Use specific reasons and examples to support your opinion.
    • In what ways is a live performance enjoyable?
    • In what ways is an event on television enjoyable?
    • What events are better viewing in each method?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have a 15-minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
showing (n) performance of a specialized quality
There were so many movie showings to choose from.
rendition (n) performance or interpretation
The dancer did her own rendition of the famous scene.
live (adj) at a particular performance, not a recording
She preferred to watch live performances rather than the movie version.
captivating (adj) capable of attracting and holding attention
She thought the movie was captivating and suspenseful.
perform (v) present to an audience
He loved to perform in front of people.
engage (v) occupy or attract someone’s attention
The actor’s job was to engage the audience.
lighten up (expression) be less serious
There was a lot of comedy to lighten up the dramatic scenes.
move along (expression) develop or progress
The drama had to move along at an interesting pace.
nod off (expression) fall asleep
The performance wasn’t interesting so he began to nod off.
be in the limelight (expression) the center of attention
She was so dramatic that she enjoyed being in the limelight with everyone watching her.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“We aren’t in an information age. We’re in an entertainment age.”
― Tony Robbins

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Learning about Past

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Learning about the past has no value for those of us living in the present. Do you agree or disagree? Use specific reasons and examples to support your answer.
    • In what ways would learning about the past have value?
    • In what ways would learning about the past not have value?
    • Describe a time when you learned something about the past.

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
background (n) situations of a previous time
She had to explain her educational background in the interview.
past (n) a previous time or era
What kind of past did she have?
thoughtful (adj) showing consideration for others
He was so thoughtful in how he treated his younger siblings.
valuable (adj) of great worth or significance
Experiences are very valuable things to learn from.
reflect (v) think carefully or deeply about
Take a minute to reflect on your journey thus far.
experience (v) encounter or undergo
She wanted to experience all that she could during her trip.
mull over (expression) think about extensively
Could I mull over my answers a little longer?
own up (expression) admit to
He asked her to own up to her mistakes.
read up on (expression) research
She wanted to read up on the history of her city.
draw a blank (expression) get no response from a question
He drew a blank and didn’t know what the correct answer was. 

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.”
― Soren Kierkeggard

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Is Progress Good?

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Do you agree or disagree that progress is always good? Use specific reasons and examples to support your answer.
    • In what ways does progress benefit you?
    • In what ways does progress not benefit you?
    • What are some examples from history that support your point?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
progress (n) forward or onward movement
She wondered if progress was always a good thing in making things better.
hurdle (n) obstacle or hindrance
Although they faced several hurdles during their long project, they finally succeeded.
innovative (adj) featuring new methods
The kids were so innovative in their new creations.
constructive (adj) serving a purpose
She was always willing to receive constructive criticism to become better at what she was doing.
advance (v) move forward in a purposeful way
They asked her to advance their project to the next level.
experiment (v) try something out to determine a conclusion
He had to experiment with several outcomes.
try out (expression) attempt to do something
We had to try out several solutions before we found one that worked.
rise above (expression) not be affected by something negative
She knew she could rise above any challenge she faced.
sign on (expression) agree to participate
Although he was reluctant to join, he finally decided to sign on to the project.
cover a lot of ground (expression) get a lot of things done, learn a lot
With so much to learn, it’s important to cover a lot of ground during each session.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“A mind that is stretched by a new experience can never go back to its old dimensions.”
― Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Art vs. Environment

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • A company is going to give some money either to support the arts or to protect the environment. Which do you think the company should choose? Use specific reasons and examples to support your answer.
    • What is the value of supporting the arts?
    • What is the value of protecting the environment?
    • What could be a way to incorporate both?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have a 15-minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
habitat (n) natural home or environment of something
They worked hard to protect the habitats of the endangered species.
philanthropy (n) the desire to promote the welfare of others
When you have a lot of money, it’s easy to do philanthropy work.
creative (adj) relating to original ideas
The arts use the ability to be creative in situations.
generous (adj) showing the readiness to give
Whatever organization was asking for money, she always found herself being very generous with her wealth.
disburse (v) pay out
She knew the time to disburse her monthly payment was coming soon.
donate (v) give to a good cause
He was glad to donate to the nonprofit organizations that were supporting the community.
add up (expression) make a satisfactory explanation for something
They tried to add up the costs of supporting the arts or the environment.
bog down (expression) slowly make progress
She became bogged down in the pages and pages of paperwork she had to complete.
give out (expression) stop working
Her hand eventually had to give out from working so hard.
green thumb (expression) a natural talent for growing plants
Her green thumb helped her to grow her amazing garden that amazed her neighbors.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“Feeling gratitude and not expressing it is like wrapping a gift and not giving it.”
― William Arthur Ward

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Decision Making Process

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Do you agree or disagree with the following statement? A person should never make an important decision alone. Use specific reasons and examples to support your answer.
    • What do other people add to a decision-making process?
    • When was a time you asked others for help in a decision?
    • When was a time when you had to make a decision yourself?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
settlement (n) official decision to resolve an issue
After hours of conversation, they finally reached a settlement on the case.
retort (n) answer or comeback
His retort was rude and too straightforward for the situation.
indecisive (adj) not settling an issue
They were annoyed when he was always indecisive about small decisions.
alone (adj) having no one else present
She was nervous when she had to make a decision alone.
collaborate (v) work jointly on an activity
She found she was more confident when they could collaborate on a project.
resolve (v) make a choice from alternatives
They decided to resolve the issue with the third option.
measure up to (expression) achieve expectations
The advice she gave seemed to measure up to what others had told her.
go through with (expression) complete something you said you’d do
He was planning to go through with the new deal.
lead on (expression) falsely provide hope
His statement seemed to lead on that he knew the answer.
bury the hatchet (expression) stop fighting
They came to a resolution and decided to bury the hatchet and move on with their lives.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“Once you make a decision, the universe conspires to make it happen.”
― Ralph Waldo Emerson

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Face-to-Face Communication

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Do you agree or disagree with the following statement? Face-to-face communication is better than other types of communication, such as letters, E-mail, or telephone calls. Use specific reasons and details to support your answer.
    • What are the benefits of having face-to-face communication?
    • What are the benefits of having communication by other means?
    • Which one do you prefer to utilize the most?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
e-mail (n) messages distributed through electronic means
Did you get my e-mail from yesterday about the party?
correspondence (n) exchanged letters
My grandmother preferred to save correspondence letters in her drawer.
digital (adj) relating or storing data
What kind of digital communication do you use?
verbal (adj) relating to or in the form of words
She preferred verbal over written communication.
announce (v) make a declaration
The speaker announced that the show was about to begin.
text (v) send a text message to someone
She told me she would text me when she was done with work.
take notice of (expression) listen, pay attention
She could take notice of all the minor changes that had occurred in the room.
pass on (expression) relay a message
Could you pass on this message to my sister?
rattle off (expression) list off things quickly
She could rattle off the capitals of all the states.
keep someone posted (expression) update and inform someone of changing plans
He asked her to keep him posted about whether the event was still going on.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.”
― George Bernard Shaw

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Why Do We Work?

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • People work because they need money to live. What are some other reasons that people work? Discuss one or more of these reasons. Use specific examples and details to support your answer.
    • What is a reason someone who enjoys their job would work?
    • What is a reason someone who doesn’t enjoy their job would work?
    • What are your reasons for doing your work?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
value (n) the importance, usefulness of something
She wondered what the value of her everyday work was.
employment (n) the condition of having paid work
He was thankful to have consistent employment.
satisfied (adj) contented, pleased
Everyone wants a job where they feel satisfied.
monetary (adj) relating to currency
Monetary gain shouldn’t be the only reason one works.
cultivate (v) prepare, acquire something
She wanted to cultivate an environment of learning.
flourish (v) develop efficiently
The students flourished in their new classroom.
rope into (expression) get someone to help
He wondered how he got roped into doing this project.
shake up (expression) change something in a process
The manager decided to shake up their regular processes.
slack off (expression) reduce one’s work
He was tempted to slack off when his manager wasn’t looking.
work like a charm (expression) something turns out exactly how you wanted
With the new system in place, the machine worked like a charm. 

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“Work like you don’t need money. Love like you’ve never been hurt. Dance like nobody’s watching.”
― Satchel Paige

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Risk Taker

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Some people like to do only what they already do well. Other people prefer to try new things and take risks. Which do you prefer? Use specific reasons and examples to support your choice.
    • What benefits are there in doing what you do well?
    • What benefits are there in taking risks?
    • What value comes with being willing to take risks?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
confidence (n) feeling or belief that you can rely on someone
She entered the room with confidence that she was going to do well.
chance (n) possibility of something happening
She wondered what the chance of rain was for the day.
risky (adj) full of the possibility of danger
Skydiving can be seen as a risky activity.
uncertain (adj) not able to be relied on
She was uncertain about the future.
risk (v) expose to potential harm or danger
She was afraid of risking her safety.
venture (v) dare to do something that may be dangerous
He was excited to venture out on a new adventure.
slow down (expression) be less active
She had to slow down before making any more decisions.
account for (expression) explain
Before she did anything, she had to account for all the possible options.
bank on (expression) count or rely on
He could bank on the fact that the ropes would be secure.
done at your own risk (expression) with the foreknowledge that there is implied danger
She knew that going swimming was at her own risk.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“The biggest risk is not taking any risk. In a world that is changing really quickly, the only strategy that is guaranteed to fail is not taking risks.”
― Mark Zuckerberg

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.