Classmate vs. Parents

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Do you agree or disagree with the following statement? Classmates are a more important influence than parents on a child’s success in school. Use specific reasons and examples to support your answer.
    • What value do parents bring to a child’s success in school?
    • What value do classmates bring to a child’s success in school?
    • Give an example of how you have been influenced by either parents or classmates.

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
parent (n) a father or mother
She knew her parents had a big influence on her receiving perfect grades.
classmate (n) a fellow member of a class or school activity
He could always trust that his classmate knew what was going on.
authoritative (adj) able to be trusted as being accurate or true
Her parents spoke with an authoritative voice that she listened to.
influential (adj) having great influence on someone or something
They wondered whether his parents or classmates were more influential in his life.
persuade (v) cause someone to do something through reasoning or argument
The group of classmates could often persuade the teacher for more time on an assignment.
aid (v) help, of a practical nature
The classmate that sat next to her was eager to aid her in the worksheets.
abide by (expression) respect or follow the rules
None of her classmates like to abide by the rules.
clamp down on (expression) to act strictly to prevent something
His mom always clamped down on him so he would do his homework immediately.
deal with (expression) to manage or take care of something
Her father always knew how to deal with difficult math problems.
back to basics (expression) approach using traditional methods
After struggling with the problem for a while, the teacher suggested they went back to basics and start over.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“If we teach today as we taught yesterday, then we rob our children of tomorrow.”
― John Dewey

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Old Historic Buildings

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Should a city try to preserve its old, historic buildings or destroy them and replace them with modern buildings? Use specific reasons and examples to support your opinion.
    • What are the advantages of preserving historic buildings?
    • What are the advantages of replacing historic buildings?
    • What is one of your favorite historic building you’ve seen?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
landmark (n) a location easily seen or having significance
e.g. example
building (n) structure with a roof and walls
Each developer had a different design for the new building.
historical (adj) concerning past events
Not everyone knew the historical significance of the house.
modern (adj) relating to the present or recent times
They were looking for a more modern appearance on the block.
preserve (v) maintain something in its original state
Some want to preserve historical landmarks because of their importance in the community.
demolish (v) to destroy
They needed all the signatures before they could demolish the building.
tear down (expression) destroy completely
In four days, they were going to tear down the beloved monument.
fall through (expression) fail, doesn’t happen
The plans for the new building were going to fall through if they didn’t do anything.
wear out (expression) to become unusable
The steps going up to the front have begun to wear out.
bet the ranch (expression) risk everything you have
When making the decision, he bet the ranch that he was right.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“We shape our buildings; thereafter they shape us.”
― Winston Churchill

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Company vs. Self-employed

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Some people prefer to work for themselves or own a business. Others prefer to work for an employer. Would you rather be self-employed, work for someone else, or own a business? Use specific reasons to explain your choice.
    • What are the benefits of being self-employed?
    • What are the benefits of working for someone else?
    • What are the benefits of owning your own business?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
entrepreneur (n) someone who operates a business
To be an entrepreneur, it helps to be ambitious about your dream.
employee (n) someone paid for their work in wages
After owning her own business, she had to re-learn what it meant to be an employee of a large organization.
self-employed (adj) working for oneself as a freelancer
She wanted to be self-employed and set her own schedule.
hard-working (adj) tending to work with energy and commitment
Employers like hard-working employees.
hire (v) employ for wages
He hired the man on the spot.
succeed (v) achieve the desired aim or result
She knew she had what it took to succeed in the job.
move up (expression) adjust one’s position
He wondered if one day he would move up in the company.
keep on (expression) continue to do something
She knew that she just needed to keep on doing her own work.
end up (expression) to finally reach a place, state or action
He wasn’t sure which company he would end up in.
work for peanuts (expression) work for very little compensation
Even though he had been there for years, he still felt that he worked for peanuts compared to his higher-paid co-workers.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“Self-belief and hard work will always earn you success.”
― Virat Kohli

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Valuable Lessons in Life

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Do you agree or disagree with the following statement? Most experiences in our lives that seemed difficult at the time become valuable lessons for the future. Use reasons and specific examples to support our answer.
    • What difficult experiences have you worked through?
    • What difficult experiences have you seen others work through?
    • How have you learned from those experiences?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
lesson (n) a thing learned by experience
Going through difficulties can teach you a lesson about life.
purpose (n) the reason for which something is done
Soon you’ll be able to see the purpose of the experience.
significant (adj) sufficiently great
What is one event that has been significant for you?
valuable (adj) extremely useful or important
She knew that losing her job would be valuable at some point.
prosper (v) flourish, make successful
Changing companies allowed him to prosper in what he loved.
discover (v) become aware of
Without moving, she wouldn’t have discovered her love for the outdoors.
learn from (expression) gain insight based on something
It’s always helpful to learn from our mistakes.
believe in (expression) feel confident about
To succeed, she needed to believe in her abilities.
come across (expression) the way people perceive someone or something
She hoped she didn’t come across as pushy or aggressive.
larger than life (expression) attracting special attention
Her larger than life personality was a little overwhelming at times.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“You can’t go back and change the beginning, but you can start where you are and change the ending.”
― C.S. Lewis

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Intelligence vs. Sense of Humor

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • What do you want most in a friend – someone who is intelligent, someone who has a sense of humor or someone who is reliable? Which one of these characteristics is most important to you? Use reasons and specific examples to explain your choice.
    • What qualities do you look for in a friend?
    • Why are those qualities important to you?
    • Which qualities do you see as a priority?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
priority (n) being treated as more important
The characteristic of reliable was more of a priority than intelligence.
intelligence (n) ability to acquire and share knowledge
Her friends had a high level of intelligence, which made their conversations interesting.
reliable (adj) consistently good in quality
She wanted a friend who was reliable and could depend on.
humorous (adj) causing lighthearted laughter
He loved how she was so humorous all the time.
laugh (v) express lively amusement
He always made me laugh till my stomach hurt.
gather (v) assemble for a purpose
They all had to gather in the kitchen for the announcement.
fall for (expression) intense attraction to someone or something
He couldn’t help but fall for the girl.
give away (expression) to distribute without expecting anything in return
Her friend was always willing to give away her clothes to anyone who had a need.
leave out (expression) not include something
She had to leave out the part that she had a temper.
shoulder to cry on (expression) someone to listen to your problems
She knew she was always there as a shoulder to cry on when life got difficult.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“The great thing about new friends is that they bring new energy to your soul.”
― Shauna Rodriguez

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Choice for Teenagers

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Do you agree or disagree with the following statement? Parents or other adult relatives should make important decisions for their older (15 to 18year-old) teenage children. Use specific reasons and examples to support your opinion.
    • What are the benefits of having a parent or relative make decisions for children?
    • What could be concerning about having a parent make decisions for their children?
    • What kind of important decisions do you think would be included in this argument?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have a 15-minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
decision (n) conclusion reached
She made the decision to leave very quickly.
authority (n) the power to make decisions
Even though they weren’t her biological parents, they still had authority over her.
indecisive (adj) not settling an issue
He tended to be very indecisive when it came to knowing what to do.
definitive (adj) decision reached with authority
Without any arguing, she accepted the definitive answer.
determine (v) make a decision or choice from alternatives
She didn’t know how to determine the right action on her own.
permit (v) allow someone to do something
She hoped that her mother would permit her to go to the concert.
abide by (expression) accept or follow a decision
As long as she lived in their house, she had to abide by their rules.
cut off (expression) disconnect, remove
He was going to be cut off from communication if he disobeyed again.
hold on (expression) wait, hesitate
Her parents wanted to hold on to whatever decisions they could still make for her.
own flesh and blood (expression) member of your family
He couldn’t believe they were his own flesh and blood with how different they were.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“It is in your moments of decision that your destiny is shaped.”
― Tony Robbins

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Games for Adults

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Do you agree or disagree with the following statement? Games are as important for adults as they are for children. Use specific reasons and examples to support your answer.
    • What games do you enjoy playing?
    • What value to games bring?
    • How can you encourage others to play games?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have a 15-minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
strategy (n) plan of action
She loved playing games that involved a lot of strategy and thinking.
diversion (n) recreation or past time
When he was stressed about work, playing a game with his kids was a great diversion to help him think about other things.
entertaining (adj) providing amusement or enjoyment
Game night at their house was always an entertaining time spent with great friends.
childish (adj) silly and immature
Some adults think games are just childish.
compete (v) strive to win something
She loved to compete in all kinds of sporting activities.
score (v) the number of points received in a game
He didn’t care what the final score was because he had a lot of fun. 
jazz up (expression) make something more interesting or attractive
Incorporating a game night into his routine helped to jazz up his schedule.
lighten up (expression) be less serious
Playing a board game always helped him to lighten up on a bad day.
play around (expression) be silly
The college students loved to play around on the basketball courts.
play your cards right (expression) use your resources wisely
He knew he could get out of this mess as long as he played his cards right and was wise with his moves.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation.”
― Plato

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Get Things Done vs. Taking Time

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Some people are always in a hurry to go places and get things done. Other people prefer to take their time and live life at a slower pace. Which do you prefer? Use specific reasons and examples to support your answer.
    • What are the benefits of hurrying to get things done?
    • What are the benefits of living life at a slower pace?
    • What are the dangers of each extreme?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
pace (n) speed at which something takes place
The teacher kept a busy pace by keeping her students always engaged.
timetable (n) plan of what takes place at what times
She had to follow the timetable that her work followed in order to always stay ahead of the game.
hurried (adj) rushed
She could never enjoy her hurried breakfast that she ate on the way out the door.
steadfast (adj) firm and unwavering
His work pace was steadfast, which made him very dependable.
accomplish (v) achieve or completely settle
She had to accomplish everything on her to-do list before she could go to bed.
preoccupy (v) dominate or engross the mind with something
She had to do something to preoccupy her thoughts.
hold onto (expression) keep as long as possible
She had to hold onto her chaotic schedule for as long as she could.
live for (expression) believe something is very important
The CEO felt like he lived for the weekends with his family.
plow through (expression) read or accomplish something difficult in a short time
Despite the length, she plowed through the entire book in one sitting.
ahead of the curve (expression) ahead of current thinking or trends
Since he was always on the move, he felt he was ahead of the curve in his market researching practices.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“If you want to conquer fear, don’t sit at home and think about it. Go out and get busy.”
― Dale Carnegie

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Business and Profit

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Do you agree or disagree with the following statement? Businesses should do anything they can to make a profit. Use specific reasons and examples to support your position.
    • What sorts of things do businesses do to ensure they make a profit?
    • What dangers can this obsession result in?
    • Should profit always be the top priority for a company?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have a 15-minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
profit (n) financial gain
To some companies, profit is the most important thing.
receipt (n) statement acknowledging something has been purchased
She asked for the receipt of her purchase.
greedy (adj) showing intense selfishness
Some businessmen can come off as greedy and only care about profits.
obsessed (adj) preoccupied constantly
The managers of the company were obsessed with making large profit margins.
sacrifice (v) giving up something of value for the sake of something else.
The employees had to sacrifice a lot to get their numbers.
merit (v) earn, be worthy of
The findings were good enough to merit bonuses for all employees.
rent out (expression) allow usage for a fee
When money was tight, they decided to rent out their extra bedroom.
buy into (expression) accept an idea
In order to do well, they had to get people to buy into their idea.
dish up (expression) serve
She could dish up a new idea easily in every meeting.
crunch the numbers (expression) do a lot of calculations
They wanted to crunch the numbers several times to be sure they had the right profit margins.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“A man must be big enough to admit his mistakes, smart enough to profit from them and strong enough to correct them.”
― John C. Maxwell

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Movies: Make You Think or Entertain?

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Some movies are serious, designed to make the audience think. Other movies are designed primarily to amuse and entertain. Which type of movie do you prefer? Use specific reasons and examples to support your answer.
    • What do you enjoy about what movie you prefer?
    • What value do these types of movies bring?
    • What are some drawbacks of only having one particular type of movie?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have a 15-minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
cinema (n) production of movies
People have different preferences of cinema in today’s media.
theater (n) building or area that plays entertainment
We couldn’t wait to visit the theater for the first time.
comedic (adj) relating to jokes and satire
She couldn’t stop watching the comedic movie that made her laugh so much. 
contemplative (adj) expressing prolonged thought
The trouble the characters went through made the movie very contemplative and made him think a lot.
amuse (v) cause to be funny
The movie amused the crowd with its many jokes.
observe (v) notice or perceive something
He enjoyed observing the characters in each of the storylines.
filter out (expression) remove something unwanted
He wanted to filter out all the scary movies from his collection.
hear of (expression) know of something’s existence
She had never heard of the particular genre of movies.
root for (expression) support
By the end of the movie, everyone had to root for the main character.
test the waters (expression) try something out to see if it will be successful
Before watching the full series, she had to test the waters by watching just one episode.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“Life is like a movie, write your own ending. Keep believing. Keep pretending.”
― Jim Henson

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.