4 questions to ask yourself when you have to make a big decision

ATTENTION
This content is recommended for 30~60 minute sessions. Note that tutors may not be familiar with the content. Make sure you consult with your tutor before using this material. 


Article

After a quick greeting, read the following article out loud. Your tutor will go over pronunciation if necessary.

[Photo: SARINYAPINNGAM/iStock]


[P1] For me, decision making is one of those things that I haven’t gotten better at with age. While I might know more than my younger self, I’ve also realized just how much more I don’t know. That realization is pretty scary when it comes to making big decisions. And the more of those I made, the more I realized just how much it changed the direction of my life, for better or worse.

[P2] Sure, you should do your research and gather as much information as you can. But at the end of the day, you’ll usually have to make do with incomplete information. With that in mind, there are questions you can ask yourself to get a better understanding of the right next steps to take. Here are four things you should think about:

1. HOW SIGNIFICANT IS THIS DECISION IN THE BIGGER SCHEME OF THINGS?
[P3] Not all decisions are created equal. Some decisions only affect the situation you’re experiencing right at that moment, or that day. It’s not worth it to sweat those, Mike Whitaker, author of The Decision Makeover: an Intentional Approach to Living the Way You Want, told Fast Company in 2017. So before you obsess over making what you perceive is a tough choice, think about how much it would really affect your day-to-day life.

[P4] Whitaker went on to say that when you have identified a big decision (which successful people tend to make once or twice a year), you should follow the strategies below:

  • Keep five prime goals and stay focused on them
  • Identify top priority and give it favorable treatment when making decisions
  • Look for a goal and decision overlap, and treat this decision with more care
  • Appreciate the momentum and identify the benefits of continuing to move in the right direction.

2. GIVEN THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE DECISION, HOW LONG WILL I GIVE MYSELF TO DECIDE?
[P5] There are two kinds of decision makers, productivity expert and author Laura Vanderkam wrote in 2016: “maximizers,” those who are committed to finding the absolute best option, and “satisficers” who have a set of criteria, and make their decision based on the first option that meets it. On its face, maximizers might seem like the best approach to take, but unfortunately, this can actually paralyze decision making. In the back of their minds, they know there’s always something better out there.

[P6] If you fall into this camp, time coach Elizabeth Grace Saunders suggested budgeting a time for your decision. Yes, that includes big decisions. Once you’ve made it, make sure to reward yourself or celebrate.

3. WHAT WOULD I ADVISE SOMEONE ELSE IN MY POSITION?
[P7] Let’s face it, we’re all better at making decisions for other people. How many times have you watched a colleague or friend do something cringeworthy, and think, “I wouldn’t do that if I were them?”

[P8] As Stephanie Vozza previously reported for Fast Company, when you make the decision on behalf of someone else, “They feel less tired and rely less on decision shortcuts to make their choices.” In addition, they’re less likely to be clouded by emotions or ego, which often creeps into your decision-making process more than what you’d like to think.

[P9] So the next time you feel frazzled and uncertain, step back and consider, “How would I advise someone else in my position to act?” Ideally, you should think of someone who you’re not too close to, and whose circumstances you can assess in a completely dispassionate way. You might just find that the answer is much clearer than you think.

4. WHAT DOES MY GUT SAY?
[P10] While your gut shouldn’t be the deciding factor (research shows that it often contains biases that override our rational thoughts), you shouldn’t ignore it altogether. At the very least, your “gut feeling” is an indication of your emotions toward a particular outcome. Once you processed that particular emotion and understand where it comes from, you’re in a much better space to make a rational decision, and less likely to be clouded by them.

Source: https://www.fastcompany.com/40581993/4-questions-to-ask-yourself-when-you-have-to-make-a-big-decision

Vocabulary

Read the word/expression and definition out loud. Your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
sweat (v) to work very hard
e.g. They sweated and saved so their children could go to college.
paralyze (v) to make (someone or something) unable to function, act, or move
e.g. The air strikes have paralyzed the city’s transportation system.
fall into camp (v) A group of people who think alike or share a cause; side
e.g. The council members disagreed, falling into liberal and conservative camps.
cringeworthy (adj) causing feelings of embarrassment or awkwardness.
e.g. The play’s cast was excellent, but the dialogue was unforgivably cringeworthy.
frazzle (v) to make (someone) very nervous or upset
e.g. He’s a clever player who knows how to frazzle his opponents.

Discussion Questions

Use the following questions as a guideline to help develop an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  1. Summarize the article in your own words.
  2. What were some of the big decisions you made this year?
  3. Are you a ‘maximizer’ or ‘satisfier’?
  4. Describe your own decision making process. Share your thoughts with your Cambly tutor!

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

How to find your superpower

ATTENTION
This content is recommended for 30~60 minute sessions. Note that tutors may not be familiar with the content. Make sure you consult with your tutor before using this material. 


Article

After a quick greeting, read the following article out loud. Your tutor will go over pronunciation if necessary.

[Images: courtesy of Marvel Studios 2018]


[P1] Determining strengths and weaknesses is an integral part of most professionals’ personal development. After all, if you don’t know where you’re strongest, you may have trouble aligning your work with your best skills and may even miss the boat on developing essentials skills for the future. An array of evaluation tools has emerged to help in this endeavor.

[P2] But among the varied strengths and weaknesses any given person might have, there is usually a dominant gift—an attribute, skill, or ability that is stronger than the rest. Decorated police sergeant, author, and reality television star Derrick Levasseur—formerly on CBS’s Big Brother and currently on Investigative Discovery’s Breaking Homicide –calls them “superpowers.”

[P3] A fan of superhero franchises like The Avengers, Levasseur reasons that the difference between you and your coworker can be compared to the difference between Superman and Spiderman. Both have similar goals, but the exceptional abilities that can realize them may be quite different, as he explores in his new book, The Undercover Edge: Find Your Hidden Strengths, Learn to Adapt, and Build the Confidence to Win Life’s Game.

[P4] “Sometimes, in our society, we try and do what everyone else is doing to be successful when, in actuality, what we should be doing is using what’s successful to us,” he says.

[P5] While finding your superpower may seem like a frivolous exercise, determining your dominant strengths in this way can help you understand where you have a true advantage over pursuing the same goals. So, with a nod to the ubiquitous superhero presence in pop culture today, here are four questions that can help you uncover your own superpowers.

WHAT FEELS EFFORTLESS?
[P6] Think about the activities in which you are completely focused, and it’s easy to get to a place of peak performance. For some, this might be presenting. For others, it might be solving very complex analytical problems. Look for the areas in which you excel without much effort—those are likely indicators of your strongest abilities, says career coach Val Nelson.

[P7] “Something that you get into the flow zone with–what they call peak performance zone, where you lose track of time, it just feels so good, you feel one with the project—we’re probably using something that we have a high level of skill with when that’s happening,”

HOW DO YOU AMAZE OTHERS?
[P8] Have you been told repeatedly that you’re good at something? Do people seek you out to give advice or input in particular areas or lend a hand with certain projects? This type of feedback and request for assistance could indicate where your superpowers lie, Levasseur says.

[P9] “You have to listen to what’s being said around you,” he says. That includes everything from casual comments to performance reviews. Look for patterns in the commentary to get clues about where you might be more effective than you think you are.

[P10] It’s not unusual for people to have blind spots about their exceptional strengths or even discount them because these skills or talents come so easily to them, Nelson says. Sometimes, it’s helpful to ask trusted colleagues or mentors about where they see your most dominant strengths, she says.

WHAT MAKES YOU WILLING TO SACRIFICE?
[P11] Superpowers are forged trough a combination of passion and mastery, says Danny Gutknecht, CEO and cofounder of recruitment and leadership advisory firm Pathways and coauthor of Meaning at Work and Its Hidden Language. “Passion” is not just in a way that makes you happy, but in a way that motivates you and makes you want to do more, even if it means hard work or other sacrifice.

[P12] He says he likes to ask people to think about what they’re going when time, “melts,” he says. “And you’re having so much joy that you’re willing to struggle for it?” For example, a nurse might say they love the clinical aspect of taking care of patients, even though it can be difficult, time-consuming work. But, instead, it makes them want to learn more and do their job better. “What are you doing when you have that deep interest that makes you want to do things better,” he asks. That’s a good indication of where your superpower lies.

WHEN ARE YOU FEARLESS?
[P13] Think back over your work and other experiences to where you were most confident. Are there times when you felt comfortable and confident enough to take measured risks and stretch your abilities? That comfort level is a sign that you have a true strength in that area, says organizational psychologist Katy Caselli, founder and president of Building Giants, LLC, a workforce training and development firm, and author of Building Giants: A Proven System to Transform Your Workforce Through Effective Training.

[P14] Often, the things that you’re good at are also things that you enjoy, she says. “If you go to work every day and you feel like you’ve done what you’re really good at, that is what helps you realize, ‘I really had a good day. I got to tinker. I got to learn. I got to figure something out for the company. I got to fix a problem. I got to make a team work better together,’” she says. Those feelings and thoughts are good indicators that you’re tapping into your strengths, she adds.

Source: https://www.fastcompany.com/40578240/how-to-find-your-superpower

Vocabulary

Read the word/expression and definition out loud. Your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
frivolous (adj) not important : not deserving serious attention
e.g. a frivolous conversation
ubiquitous (adj) seeming to be seen everywhere
e.g. The company’s advertisements are ubiquitous.
flow zone (v) in positive psychology, flow, also known colloquially as being in the zone, is the mental state of operation in which a person performing an activity is fully immersed in a feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and enjoyment in the process of the activity.
blind spots (n) an area around a car, truck, etc., that the driver cannot see
e.g. When driving on the highway, you need to make sure no one is in your blind spot before changing lanes.
tinker (v) to try to repair or improve something (such as a machine) by making small changes or adjustments to it
e.g. He was tinkering in the garage.

Discussion Questions

Use the following questions as a guideline to help develop an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  1. Summarize the article in your own words.
  2. Which activities feel effortless to you? When are you fearless?
  3. What is a “flow zone”? Describe a time when you felt like you were in a flow.
  4. What are your superpowers? Share your thoughts with your Cambly tutor!

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Anthony Bourdain has died in an apparent suicide at 61

ATTENTION
This content is recommended for 30~60 minute sessions. Note that tutors may not be familiar with the content. Make sure you consult with your tutor before using this material. 


Article

After a quick greeting, read the following article out loud. Your tutor will go over pronunciation if necessary.

Business Insider/Sarah Jacobs

[P1] Anthony Bourdain, the celebrity chef who hosted CNN’s “Parts Unknown,” was found dead Friday morning, CNN reports.

[P2] Bourdain’s body was found in his hotel room in France, where he had been working on new episodes of “Parts Unknown,” in which he traveled the world and reported on local cuisine and culture. The apparent cause of death was suicide, CNN said, with early reports indicating he hanged himself.

[P3] “It is with extraordinary sadness we can confirm the death of our friend and colleague, Anthony Bourdain,” CNN in a statement Friday morning. “His love of great adventure, new friends, fine food and drink, and the remarkable stories of the world made him a unique storyteller. His talents never ceased to amaze us and we will miss him very much. Our thoughts and prayers are with his daughter and family at this incredibly difficult time. He was quite a character,” President Donald Trump told reporters at the White House on Friday. “Very sad,” he said.

[P4] In 2000, Bourdain wrote “Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly,” which detailed his life as a chef. The book, which became a best-seller, marked the beginning of his breakout as a crossover star, leaving behind day-to-day chef work to explore opportunities in storytelling in print and on-screen.

[P5] Throughout the late 2000s and 2010s Bourdain racked up an impressive reel of awards and nominations for his work. In a 2017 interview with The Guardian, Bourdain reflected on his life in kitchens and said he’d been able to find peace out of a chaotic upbringing, saying he had “put aside my psychotic rage, after many years being awful to line cooks, abusive to waiters, bullying to dishwashers. Nowadays I still have a rather withering ability to be sarcastic and displeased but I’m not screaming at anyone,” he told The Guardian.

[P6] Bourdain was born in New York City and grew up in New Jersey. He would have been 62 on June 25. Despite his success, Bourdain was known to struggle with drug addiction and had a history of heroin use. “I was an unhappy soul, with a huge heroin and then crack problem,” Bourdain said in The Guardian interview. “I hurt, disappointed and offended many, many, many people and I regret a lot. It’s a shame I have to live with.”

[P7] Bourdain is survived by a daughter and by his girlfriend, the Italian actress Asia Argento. Argento is a vocal critic of the Hollywood film producer Harvey Weinstein, whom she has accused of sexual assault.

[P8] Just one day before Bourdain’s death, the New York City Medical Examiner’s Office confirmed that the designer Kate Spade’s cause of death earlier this week was a suicide.

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/anthony-bourdain-has-died-in-an-apparent-suicide-by-hanging-at-61-2018-6

Vocabulary

Read the word/expression and definition out loud. Your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
cease (v) to stop happening : to end
e.g. The conversation abruptly ceased. [=halted]
culinary (adj) used in or relating to cooking
e.g. They serve a variety of culinary delights.
breakout (n) having, causing, or marked by sudden and great success that comes usually after a time without much success
e.g. The company had a breakout year last year, tripling its profits from the previous year.
crossover (n) a change from one style or type of activity to another
e.g. The actor made a smooth crossover to politics.
wither (v) to become dry and weak
e.g. Our hopes have withered away. [=died away]

Discussion Questions

Use the following questions as a guideline to help develop an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  1. Summarize the article in your own words.
  2. Do you know Anthony Bourdain? How would you describe him in your own words?
  3. What makes a great cook?
  4. Do you have a personal hero? Share your thoughts with your Cambly tutor!

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Octopuses are officially the weirdest animals on Earth

ATTENTION
This content is recommended for 30~60 minute sessions. Note that tutors may not be familiar with the content. Make sure you consult with your tutor before using this material. 


Article

After a quick greeting, read the following article out loud. Your tutor will go over pronunciation if necessary.

octopus vulgaris


[P1] Octopuses have blue blood, can change colors, and regrow their tentacles. But what really makes them stand out is even weirder: they can edit their own RNA. Following is a transcript of the video.

[P2] Octopuses are the weirdest animal on earth. I know what you’re thinking… Is it because they have three hearts? Blue blood? That they can regrow their limbs? Or how they’re known to use tools? Or change colors whenever they want? And of course, all that is cool, but it’s just the beginning.

[P3] Turns out, octopuses — and their close coleoid relatives — have a unique ability to edit significant amounts of their RNA. They’ve been doing this since before modern humans showed up 200,000 years ago.

[P4] And while scientists aren’t sure how or why it started, studies suggest that octopuses today are editing their RNA to adapt to temperature changes in their environment. RNA is sort of like DNA editing but, in some ways, even better.

[P5] “You can think of it as spell checking. If you have a word document. If you want to change the information, you take one letter and you replace it with another.”

[P6] But what makes RNA editing different from DNA editing is the long-term effects. Your DNA, for instance, is identical in each one of your trillions of adult cells. So, changing the code in one cell, changes it forever and fundamentally alters your genome, which is passed down to your children and every generation thereafter.

[P7] This is how the majority of the animal kingdom evolves. But octopuses do things differently, by also editing their RNA, which allows them to “try out” adaptations in the short-term without messing with entire generations to come.

[P8] “In this aspect, RNA mutations, or RNA editing events, are much less dangerous. You can play with the RNA. You can test many different possibilities without damaging the master copy of your genetic information.”

[P9] Unlike DNA, changes to RNA are NOT hereditary. It also means that you can target certain body parts and edit the RNA in them individually. In fact, research groups have discovered that octopuses tend to edit the RNA in their brain tissue more than anywhere else. Which has led some experts to hypothesize this is why octopuses are the most intelligent of all invertebrates on the planet.

[P10] Now, most organisms — including humans — have the enzyme necessary for RNA editing but the general consensus is it’s by and large just not worth the effort. Humans, for example, have around 10 RNA editing sites, but octopuses have tens of thousands.

[P11] Prof. Eli Eisenberg: “It’s really a completely new story.” So, octopuses and their coleoid cousins truly are bizarre but it may not be the case for too much longer. Scientists have recently proven ways of using CRISPR to edit RNA, too. Perhaps they can learn a thing or two from the experts.

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/octopus-weirdest-animals-rna-editing-super-powers-2018-5

Vocabulary

Read the word/expression and definition out loud. Your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
tentacles (n) one of the long, flexible arms of an animal (such as an octopus) that are used for grabbing things and moving
e.g. Octopuses have eight tentacles.
adapt (v) to change your behavior so that it is easier to live in a particular place or situation
e.g. When children go to a different school, it usually takes them a while to adapt.
alter (v) to change (something)
e.g. Alcohol can alter a person’s mood.
hereditary (adj) passed or able to be passed from parent to child before birth
e.g. He suffers from a rare hereditary condition.
invertebrate (n) a type of animal that does not have a backbone
e.g. Worms are invertebrates.

Discussion Questions

Use the following questions as a guideline to help develop an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  1. Summarize the article in your own words.
  2. Why does the author say octopuses are the weirdest animal on earth?
  3. How is RNA different from DNA?
  4. If you can change your body like an octopus, what would you like to be able to do? Share your thoughts with your Cambly tutor!

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Here’s How to Tell If You’re Experiencing an ‘Introvert Hangover’

ATTENTION
This content is recommended for 30~60 minute sessions. Note that tutors may not be familiar with the content. Make sure you consult with your tutor before using this material. 


Article

After a quick greeting, read the following article out loud. Your tutor will go over pronunciation if necessary.

FotoHelin / Shutterstock

[P1] If you identify as more of an introvert than an extrovert, you’ll know that means you are more energised by spending time on your own, or in very small intimate groups of people you trust. It doesn’t mean you are a hermit or dislike social situations — you just often need time to recharge alone after them.

[P2] This time to regroup is sometimes called an “introvert hangover” because after a lot of social stimulation, whether that’s in a small group or a noisy overstimulated context, an introvert’s nervous system gets overwhelmed.

[P3] Essentially, an introvert brain functions differently than an extrovert brain. An extrovert has a very high threshold for dopamine, so they require constant stimulation. An introvert has a very low threshold, so they reach their limit much sooner.

[P4] Also, while an extrovert can approach an event objectively, an introvert has a lot more going on internally. For example, they notice all sorts of details, are self-conscious about themselves and the mistakes they are making, and draw a lot from their long-term memory bank when speaking. All of this is emotionally exhausting, so it’s no surprise they need to take some time to regroup afterwards.

[P5] But an introvert hangover isn’t exactly a bad thing. For most, it means curling up with a book or a film, or doing a relaxing hobby like drawing.

[P6] “During introvert hangover you can use this time to explore who you are,” Perpetua Neo, a doctor of psychology, told Business Insider. “You can accelerate your professional and personal growth… And the more comfortable you are with telling people I have an introvert hangover, this is the time for myself, I’m blocking these chunks of time dedicated to me, the more you are able to own yourself as an introvert.”

[P7] Introvert hangovers are a good time to reflect on yourself and how much you have achieved. For those who never take this time out, they may not realise the progress they’ve made. So although it’s a requirement for introverts to take time to themselves, it can also be of great benefit to them.

[P8] For some introverts, a hangover means sleeping for long periods of time, and Neo said that’s fine too.

[P9] “When you sleep, you are actually integrating all your memories, discarding all the things you don’t need, and your body is detoxing,” she said. “It also helps you to be wise, to be creative, to spend time on your own projects… It’s really about all the resources you’re going to carve out for that.”

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/what-is-an-introvert-hangover-2018-5

Vocabulary

Read the word/expression and definition out loud. Your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
hermit (n) a person who lives in a simple way apart from others especially for religious reason
threshold (v) the point or level at which something begins or changes
e.g. I have a low threshold for boredom. [=I get bored easily]
exhaust (v) to use all of someone’s mental or physical energy : to tire out or wear out (someone) completely
e.g. If you keep working these long hours, you’re just going to exhaust yourself. = Working these long hours will just exhaust you.
discard (v) to throw (something) away because it is useless or unwanted
e.g. Remove and discard the stems.
carve out (v) to create (a job, a fortune, a way of life, etc.) for yourself usually through hard work
e.g. She worked hard to carve out a career in education.

Discussion Questions

Use the following questions as a guideline to help develop an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  1. Summarize the article in your own words.
  2. What does it mean to be an ‘introvert’?
  3. What is an introvert hangover?
  4. Are you an introvert or an extrovert? Share your thoughts with your Cambly tutor!

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

A ‘Self-Fulfilling Prophecy’ Is Making the Housing Market More Hellish for First-Time Buyers

ATTENTION
This content is recommended for 30~60 minute sessions. Note that tutors may not be familiar with the content. Make sure you consult with your tutor before using this material. 


Article

After a quick greeting, read the following article out loud. Your tutor will go over pronunciation if necessary.

Drew Angerer/Getty

[P1] Home prices are near record highs in many cities across America, and the belief they’ll continue rising is encouraging more people to buy. The result is a higher barrier to entry for people who want to buy their first homes, according to David Rosenberg, the chief economist at Gluskin Sheff.

[P2] He drew his most recent observations on the housing market from the University of Michigan’s monthly survey that checks the consumer’s pulse on various parts of the economy. The interesting housing tidbits in the latest survey, released on Friday, showed:

  • [P3] The share of people who cite rising prices as the reason why it’s a good time to buy is at the highest level of the survey’s history, going back to the late 1980s. It’s “a case of expected asset inflation becoming a self-fulfilling prophecy,” Rosenberg said in a note on Tuesday. What that means is, if more people want houses because prices are rising, prices will rise even more.
  • [P4] A record 59% of people believe that home prices will rise in the coming year, as the chart shows.
  • [P5] The share of people who see it as a good time to buy because of low prices is near a record low in April. “So nobody is purchasing a home because they are cheap…principally because there are no cheap homes anywhere (at least in any desirable areas),” Rosenberg said.
  • [P6] Lastly, the index that tracks people who say buying a home today is a bad idea because of high prices was at a five-month high in April. “This speaks to stretched affordability for first-time buyers,” he said.

[P7] First-time buyers, with zero equity stored in another home, are confronted with the toughest hurdle even though they’re in the minority of buyers. According to the National Association of Realtors, first-time buyers were involved in 30% of home sales in March, down from 32% a year ago.

[P8] Rosenberg questioned whether all this shows that the next housing bubble is forming — an important one to ponder a decade after the financial crisis. Unlike the previous run up in prices, however, this rise is not underpinned by low-credit borrowers and investment products that bundled risky mortgages together.

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/home-price-expectations-self-fulfilling-prophecy-2018-5

Vocabulary

Read the word/expression and definition out loud. Your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
barrier to entry (n) the existence of high upfront costs or other obstacles that prevent new competitors from easily entering an industry or area of business
e.g. Real estate investments has high barrier to entry.
tidbit (n) a small piece of news or interesting information
e.g. tidbits of gossip
self-fulfilling prophecy (n) a prediction that directly or indirectly causes itself to become true, by the very terms of the prophecy itself, due to positive feedback between belief and behavior.
e.g. Use self-fulfilling prophecy to your advantage.
confront (v) to deal with (something, such as a problem or danger)
e.g. Firemen regularly confront danger.
ponder (v) to think about or consider (something) carefully
e.g. He pondered the question before he answered.

Discussion Questions

Use the following questions as a guideline to help develop an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  1. Summarize the article in your own words.
  2. What does “self-fulfilling prophecy” mean?
  3. Describe the housing market in your own country.
  4. Is owning a house important goal in life in your country? Share your thoughts with your Cambly tutor!

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

I Was Ripped off by Someone I Thought Was a Friend. Here’s What I Learned.

ATTENTION
This content is recommended for 30~60 minute sessions. Note that tutors may not be familiar with the content. Make sure you consult with your tutor before using this material. 


Article

After a quick greeting, read the following article out loud. Your tutor will go over pronunciation if necessary.

Shannon Fagan | Getty Images

[P1] When I first met Chris, I felt a real kinship. He was accomplished, had a strong following and had the successes that I had been struggling to achieve. Not only did he understand marketing, manage a team of virtual assistants and run ads at scale, but he was also earning hundreds of thousands of dollars every month.

[P2] After close to a year of being friends and exchanging life-changing insights on business, Chris told me about a business idea he’d recently used. He relayed to me the big success he had with doing a unique competition with another company, and he encouraged me to jump into it, too. Since I’d known Chris for a decent amount of time, I trusted him.

[P3] Excited and ready to make a killing in business, I paid over $12,000 to hire a company Chris swore was gold. Little did I know, Chris was taking half of the money I was handing over, and this company had a history of underperforming.

[P4] Once Chris was paid, he up and vanished. Poof — he was gone. My messages were ignored. My friend, the person I’d been regularly talking with, somehow became too busy to respond.

[P5] Chris taught me some hard lessons, and now I’d like to pass on this cautionary advice to you, so you can avoid being ripped off by friends, associates or anyone else in your sphere.

Don’t blindly trust friends.
[P6] The most significant mistake I made? I trusted the word of someone else without doing my research. Chris was a smooth-talking guy who had the patience of a snake waiting in the bushes. Had I done my research before trusting someone I thought was a friend, I wouldn’t have been duped out of my money.

[P7] As a former student of the monkhood, it’s hard for me to admit not everyone is a good person. This practice of befriending someone and later exploiting them is more common than any entrepreneur would like to admit. As Robert Greene states in his book The 48 Laws of Power, we should never put too much trust in so-called friends. Sadly, just because you consider someone a friend, it doesn’t mean he or she will treat you kindly in business.

[P8] Foe or friend, before you hire anyone — do your research to ensure you’re making the best choice.

Successful people aren’t always the best advisors.
[P9] Our heroes aren’t always the people we believe them to be. When taking advice, don’t just consider how successful the person is. Take a look at how many people he or she has led to the promised land and how many people have been left disappointed.

[P10] If I had researched Chris, I would have seen that I am not the first disgruntled friend in his rearview mirror. Unfortunately, I only looked at the appearance of things and not the hard facts that were spread throughout the internet. If you want to hire people, take a moment to review their past to assure they’re someone you’ll want to work with.

Never be a victim — take responsibility.
[P11] When I think about Chris, I am not mad at him. In fact, I’m thankful he taught me early about some of the most fundamental elements of business, such as how friendship and business are not always the same. I fully acknowledge I allowed the circumstances to happen and I am also powerful enough to create new outcomes. He was there to teach me, and with that, I am more aptly able to identify the “Chrises” of the world.

[P12] Take responsibility for what you create, and you’ll never really be ripped off. Instead, you’ll be given life lessons that make you more successful in business.

Source: https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/312945

Vocabulary

Read the word/expression and definition out loud. Your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
kinship (n) a feeling of being close or connected to other people
e.g. He feels a strong kinship with other survivors of the war.
relay to (v) to pass (something, such as a message or information) from one person or device to another
e.g. Please relay the news to the rest of the team.
dupe out (v) to deceive or trick (someone) into believing or doing something
e.g. They duped her out of $300.
foe (n) an enemy
e.g. political foes
disgruntled (adj) unhappy and annoyed
e.g. She has to deal with disgruntled customers all day.

Discussion Questions

Use the following questions as a guideline to help develop an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  1. Summarize the article in your own words.
  2. What are the three lessons mentioned in the writing?
  3. Have you ever been betrayed by someone you thought you were close to?
  4. How do you feel about starting business with a very close friend? Share your thoughts with your Cambly tutor!

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.