Topic: Luck

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Warm-up

In this lesson, your tutor will help you go over this topic: Luck. First, go over the following vocabulary and expressions with your tutor. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

fall into one’s lap If something good falls into your lap, it happens to you without any effort on your part.
e.g. If something good falls into your lap, it happens to you without any effort on your part.
off-chance If you do something on the off chance, you think there might be a slight possibility of success.
e.g. It would be off-chance for anyone but I’m still going to give my best shot.
give my best shot To try one’s very best
e.g. It would be off-chance for anyone but I’m still going to give my best shot.
jump on the bandwagon If a person or organization jumps on the bandwagon, they decide to seize the opportunity and do something when it is already successful or fashionable.
e.g. When startups became popular, many capable engineers were quick to jump on the bandwagon and get easy money.
get easy money Money earned without much effort
e.g. When startups became popular, many capable engineers were quick to jump on the bandwagon and get easy money.
luck of the devil to be very lucky
e.g. I had the luck of the devil to find the job I love.
anyone’s call This expression is used when the result of a contest or election is difficult to predict.
e.g. “Who do you think will win?” “It’s anyone’s call.
that ship has sailed The expression ‘that ship has sailed’ means that a particular opportunity has passed by and now it’s too late.
e.g. e’Is the offer still open?’ ‘Sorry, that ship has sailed – you missed your chance!’
beginner’s luck unusual success that you have when you start doing something new
e.g. I got two strikes in a row, but that’s just a beginner’s luck.
cross one’s fingers As the gesture evolved, people used it not just for God’s favour or luck, but to ward off evils and illnesses, among other things. These days, you don’t even have to cross your fingers, with many simply saying “fingers crossed” or “I’ve got my fingers crossed for you,” as a way to say “good luck.”
e.g. “Fingers crossed!” = good luck!

Conversation

Use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  1. Do you believe in luck?
  2. When was your luckiest moment?
  3. Which do you think is more important: luck or hard work?
  4. Do you have any gestures to wish someone good luck?
  5. Do certain objects mean good or bad luck in your culture?
  6. Do you believe in “creating your own luck”?
  7. What’s your thought on lottery?
  8. Do you think successful people are lucky?
  9. Would you say you’re a lucky person?
  10. Do you agree or disagree: “Everything in life is luck. — Donald Trump.” Share your thoughts with your Cambly tutor!

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

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