Lesson 55: Around the Neighborhood

neighborhood

Dialogue

In this lesson, your tutor will help you go over this topic: around the neighborhood. First, read the following dialogue out loud with your tutor, then switch roles and try again. 

Dorothy and Kevin are talking about things you can find in a neighborhood.

Kevin:
Dorothy, I want to talk about things that are in a neighborhood. I live near an intersection.
Dorothy:
I live in the city so I have lots of things in my neighborhood. There’s a bus stop close to my home.
Kevin:
Are there a lot of apartment buildings in your area?
Dorothy:
Yes, there are. We also have a parking garage nearby.
Kevin:
Right outside my home is a streetlight. It helps to see when we arrive home at night.
Dorothy:
I have a fire hydrant close to my home.
Kevin:
That’s important in case there’s a fire. What about a mailbox?
Dorothy:
There’s one down the road on the corner.
Kevin:
Do you have to walk on the sidewalk to get to it?
Dorothy:
Yes, I do. The mailbox is next to the stop sign.

Vocabulary

Go over the following vocabulary and expressions with your tutor. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

intersection (n) a place where two streets come together and cross
I live at the intersection of Main and Front Street.
bus stop (n) a place where the bus stops to let people on and off the bus
There are many people waiting at the bus stop.
buildings (n – plural) a structure like a house, hospital, or school with walls
There are many buildings in a city.
parking garage (n) a building where people usually pay to park their cars
The parking garage is full of cars.
streetlight (n) a light on a tall pole so people can see at night
The streetlight is bright.
fire hydrant (n) a large water pipe in the street that firefighters us to put out fires
Firefighters connect a hose to the fire hydrant.
mailbox (n) a public box where letters and packages are placed for pickup
She has three letters she needs to put in the mailbox.
corner (n) the place where two streets meet
The supermarket is on the corner of Main Street.
sidewalk (n) a concrete or cement place to walk on the side of a street
You should walk on the sidewalk and not the street.
stop sign (n) a sign telling drivers to stop and wait until it’s safe to go
The stop sign is on the corner of the street.

Exercise

Practice answering the following questions with your tutors. You can use the sample answers to come up with your own answer.

  1. Where are some places to park cars in your neighborhood?
    1. There’s a parking garage down the road from my home.
    2. In my neighborhood, we park our cars on the street.
    3. Your answer:
  2. What would you change about your neighborhood?
    1. It’s dark on my street at night. I would like to see more streetlights.
    2. There are not enough places to park. I would like to see a parking garage built.
    3. Your answer:
  3. What do you like about your neighborhood?
    1. It has a lot of stores we can walk to.
    2. My children’s school is close. We don’t have to drive there and get stuck in a traffic jam.
    3. Your answer:
  4. How far are you from the center of the city?
    1. I don’t live in the city. I have to drive one hour to get to the center.
    2. I’m in walking distance of the center of the city.
    3. Your answer:
  5. How do neighbors help each other?
    1. My neighbors watch our house when we are away on vacation.
    2. One time my neighbor help me mow the lawn when I was sick.
    3. Your answer:

Conversation

Use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  1. Tell me about some of the things in your neighborhood.
  2. What do you like and dislike about your neighborhood?
  3. Why don’t people use the sidewalk sometimes?
  4. What do people do in your neighborhood?
  5. Do you have good neighbors? Why or why not?

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

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Lesson 34: The Most Memorable Person in Your Life

family-friends

Dialogue

In this lesson, your tutor will help you go over this topic: the most memorable person in your life. First, read the following dialogue out loud with your tutor, then switch roles and try again. 

Kevin and Dorothy are talking about memorable people.

Kevin:
Dorothy, who is the most memorable person in your life?
Dorothy:
My grandfather is the most memorable person in my life.
Kevin:
Why do you admire him?
Dorothy:
He’s generous, kind, and helpful. Who is the most memorable person in your life?
Kevin:
A lot of people say a family member is the most memorable. For me, it’s my best friend. He’s always there for me.
Dorothy:
He sounds really unforgettable. Do you have a sports star you find memorable?
Kevin:
Yes, Pele is memorable to me. Not only is he a great football player, he is a caring person.
Dorothy:
I love Pele too! Do you have an actor or musician who you find memorable?
Kevin:
There are so many, but Al Pacino is probably the most well-known.
Dorothy:
One of my high school teachers is a memorable person in my life. She is a great mentor.

Vocabulary

Go over the following vocabulary and expressions with your tutor. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

memorable (adj) very good or interesting and worth remembering
I took a memorable vacation to Bermuda.
grandfather (n) the father of your father or mother
My grandfather always gives me money.
admire (v) to feel respect for someone or something
I admire my mother for her hard work.
generous (adj) showing kindness for others; freely giving and sharing
My tutor is generous with his time.
always there for me (phrase) an expression to say someone helps you when you need it
Every time I need help, you are always there for me.
unforgettable (adj) very special and difficult or hard to forget
The student had an unforgettable time studying English in London.
caring (adj) someone who is kind and has concern for others
His mother is a very caring person.
musician (n) a person who plays music or is musically talented
The musician is a talented guitar player.
well-known (adj) someone who is known by many people; sometimes famous
Her father is a well-known doctor.
mentor (n) someone who teaches or gives advice to a younger person
The professor is a mentor to many students.

Exercise

Practice answering the following questions with your tutors. You can use the sample answers to come up with your own answer.

  1. What are people well-known for?
    1. Some musicians are well-known for their songs.
    2. World leaders can be well-known for their leadership.
    3. Your answer:
  2. Why are people unforgettable?
    1. Unforgettable people are caring and generous. For example, they are people who like to help others.
    2. Some people are unforgettable because they treat others with respect.
    3. Your answer:
  3. Tell me about a memorable vacation.
    1. My wife and I went to Phuket, Thailand for our honeymoon. We had a memorable time together.
    2. I studied English in the USA. It was memorable because I met new friends.
    3. Your answer:
  4. How do mentors treat people special?
    1. Mentors take the time to help you. They want to see you succeed.
    2. Some mentors guide you in the right direction. They give you good advice.
    3. Your answer:
  5. How can people be generous?
    1. Some people are generous with their money. They donate to organizations to help people.
    2. My parents are generous to their friends. They help watch their young children sometimes.
    3. Your answer:

Conversation

Use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  1. Who’s the most memorable person in your life? Why?
  2. Tell me about a memorable time in your life.
  3. Tell me about a person who is always there for you.
  4. Who is your mentor? Why?
  5. Could people be memorable for doing bad things? Why or why not?

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

 

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Lesson 33: Going on a Road Trip

road-trip

Dialogue

In this lesson, your tutor will help you go over this topic: going on a road trip. First, read the following dialogue out loud with your tutor, then switch roles and try again. 

Dorothy and Kevin are talking about going on a road trip.

Dorothy:
Kevin, are you ready to hit the road?
Kevin:
Yes, let’s pack up and start our road trip.
Dorothy:
Long-distance travel can be boring, but I’m glad we’re going together.
Kevin:
Me too. Are we going to drive on the highway?
Dorothy:
Yes, it’s a toll road so we need to make sure we have some cash.
Kevin:
I have some. Can we make pit stops along the way? I have a small bladder.
Dorothy:
There are plenty of rest areas on the highway.
Kevin:
Cool. Rest stops usually have vending machines, in case we get hungry or thirsty.
Dorothy:
I just hope we don’t get stuck in traffic.
Kevin:
Ugh, I hate traffic. Are we there yet?

Vocabulary

Go over the following vocabulary and expressions with your tutor. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

hit the road (phrase) to start traveling
Let’s hit the road so we are not late.
pack up (v – phrase) gather all your things and get ready for travel
Let’s pack up and leave.
long-distance (adj) traveling a long way
A long-distance trip by car can be boring.
highway (n) a high-speed road, especially one connecting two cities
People can drive faster on the highway.
toll road (n) a road that drivers must pay to use
The toll road costs $10 one way.
pit stops (n – plural) informal; a place to take a rest on a trip
We will have to take a few pit stops on our road trip.
rest areas (n – plural) a place alongside the road with restrooms and picnic tables
The highway has plenty of rest areas.
vending machines (n – plural) a machine from which you can purchase food, drinks, etc.
The vending machines have lots of snacks.
stuck in traffic (phrase) to wait in your car because of a traffic jam or accident
I don’t like being stuck in traffic.
Are we there yet? (complete sentence) a question normally asked by young children on a road trip

Exercise

Practice answering the following questions with your tutors. You can use the sample answers to come up with your own answer.

  1. Why do people take road trips?
    1. In my opinion, people go on road trips for business or to see new places.
    2. Some people don’t like to fly so they travel by car.
    3. Your answer:
  2. What are some things people take along on a long-distance road trip?
    1. I always take plenty of water.
    2. I take along some toilet paper and hand cleanser.
    3. Your answer:
  3. Tell me a place you would like to go on a road trip in your country.
    1. I want to travel from Pennsylvania to Arizona.
    2. I want to go to Washington DC because there are lots of things to do.
    3. Your answer:
  4. What are some things people do on a road trip in the car?
    1. My friends and I like to sing.
    2. My children like to watch movies on their laptops.
    3. Your answer:
  5. What are some things you can see on the highway?
    1. There’re a lot of traffic signs.
    2. Sometimes, I see dead animals.
    3. Your answer:

Conversation

Use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  1. Do you like to go on road trips? Why or why not?
  2. Do you have rest areas in your country? If yes, what services do they offer? If no, do you think there should be?
  3. What do you do when you are stuck in traffic?
  4. Do you buy food and drinks from vending machines? Why or why not?
  5. Do you think all roads should be toll roads? Why or why not?

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

 

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Lesson 32: Your First Date

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Dialogue

In this lesson, your tutor will help you go over this topic: your first date. First, read the following dialogue out loud with your tutor, then switch roles and try again. 

Dorothy and Kevin are talking about first dates.

Dorothy:
Kevin, do you remember your first date? I was so shy on my first date.
Kevin:
Yes, I remember it well. I went on a double date with my best friend.
Dorothy:
That’s different. Mine was a blind date.
Kevin:
I think that’s why you were nervous and shy. Who paid for the date?
Dorothy:
We decided to go dutch.
Kevin:
Was it love at first sight?
Dorothy:
No, because he had some bad manners. For example, he let the door close in my face.
Kevin:
A first impression is important. He should have tried harder!
Dorothy:
Yes, bad behavior is not a good sign.
Kevin:
Don’t worry. I will play matchmaker and find you a better boyfriend.

Vocabulary

Go over the following vocabulary and expressions with your tutor. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

shy (adj) feeling nervous about meeting and talking to people
She’s a little shy when meeting new people.
double date (n) going out with another couple together
I’m going on a double date with my brother and his girlfriend.
blind date (n) when two people who don’t know each other go out on a date
She went out on a blind date with her cousin’s friend.
nervous (adj) feeling of being worried or afraid of what could happen
He gets nervous in elevators.
go dutch (idiom) to share the cost of something, especially a meal
Let’s go dutch tonight for dinner.
love at first sight (phrase) to fall in love with someone when you first see them
When I saw her, it was love at first sight.
bad manners (adj + n – plural) to act in a bad way with others
It’s bad manners to eat and talk at the same time.
first impression (adj + n) how you feel about someone or something at first
My first impression of my teacher was good.
behavior (n) the way a person or animal behaves or acts
The behavior of the students in class was good.
matchmaker (n) a person who tries to bring two people together
His sister likes to be a matchmaker.

Exercise

Practice answering the following questions with your tutors. You can use the sample answers to come up with your own answer.

  1. Tell me something that makes a good date.
    1. In my opinion, the person has to have good manners.
    2. It’s important that we both talk. I don’t like to do all the talking.
    3. Your answer:
  2. Tell me some ways people show bad manners.
    1. One example is when people use their mobile phones while eating.
    2. In my opinion, it’s bad manners to not say “thank you” or “you are welcome.”
    3. Your answer:
  3. What things typically make people nervous?
    1. Some people get nervous when they take tests.
    2. Sometimes people get nervous in high places.
    3. Your answer:
  4. What qualities are important to you in a boyfriend or girlfriend?
    1. One important quality for me is trustworthiness.
    2. I like when we can communicate well.
    3. Your answer:
  5. What are some good things to talk about on a first date?
    1. Personally, I like to talk about family.
    2. I really enjoy talking about holidays and travel.
    3. Your answer:

Conversation

Use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  1. Are first impressions important to you? Why or why not?
  2. Would you go out on a blind date? Why or why not?
  3. Describe a typical first date in your country.
  4. Would you go out on a double date? Why or why not?
  5. Do you believe in love at first sight? Why or why not?

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

 

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Lesson 31: Your First Job

first-day-at-work-compressed

Dialogue

In this lesson, your tutor will help you go over this topic: your first job. First, read the following dialogue out loud with your tutor, then switch roles and try again. 

Kevin and Dorothy are talking about their first job.

Kevin:
Dorothy, do you remember your first job? I worked full-time in a supermarket.
Dorothy:
Yes, I worked part-time while I was studying at the university.
Kevin:
What was your job title?
Dorothy:
I worked as a Library Assistant. It was a desk job.
Kevin:
How much were you paid?
Dorothy:
My hourly wage was $10 per hour.
Kevin:
Were you paid weekly?
Dorothy:
Actually, I was paid semi-monthly.
Kevin:
Did you enjoy working with your co-workers?
Dorothy:
Yes, I did. We worked well as a team. Teamwork is very important.

Vocabulary

Go over the following vocabulary and expressions with your tutor. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

full-time (adv) lasting all your working hours, which in the US is about 8 hrs/day
He works full-time at a clothing store. He works eight hours a day.
part-time (adv) only some part of your working hours
She works part-time as a hairstylist. She normally works four hours a day.
job title (n) the name given to your job
My job title is English Tutor.
desk job (n) work that is done mainly at a desk; sitting down
A receptionist has a desk job.
paid (adj) receiving money for work
I”m paid $100 a day to wash cars. 
wage (n) the amount of money a worker is paid based on hours worked
My wage is $20 per hour.
weekly (adj) done once a week
They clean their house weekly.
bi-monthly (adj) done twice a month
I have semi-monthly meetings with my boss.
co-workers (n – plural) the people you work with
Her co-workers are eating lunch.
teamwork (n) work together in a group
Teamwork makes my job easier.

Exercise

Practice answering the following questions with your tutors. You can use the sample answers to come up with your own answer.

  1. Do you like your job?
    1. It’s not my dream job, but I get paid well.
    2. I’m trying to find another job.
    3. Your answer:
  2. Can you tell me about some of your co-workers?
    1. One of my co-workers comes to work late a lot.
    2. I have one co-worker who never takes a break.
    3. Your answer:
  3. Can you describe your current job?
    1. I’m an English Teacher, and I work five hours per day.
    2. I work full-time as a chef at a big restaurant.
    3. Your answer:
  4. Do you like your boss?
    1. My boss is a nice person, and he’s easy to talk to.
    2. I wish I had another boss. My boss doesn’t help his workers.
    3. Your answer:
  5. What are some jobs you think would be fun?
    1. In my opinion, it would be fun to be a construction worker.
    2. I would enjoy being a language teacher.
    3. Your answer:

Conversation

Use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  1. Tell me about your first job.
  2. Do you think teamwork is important? Why or why not?
  3. Do you like a desk job or a job where you are active? Why?
  4. Would you like to be paid weekly or bi-monthly? Why?
  5. Tell me some other job titles? (For example, Accountant)

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

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Lesson 30: Asking for Help

Dialogue

In this lesson, your tutor will help you go over this topic: asking for help. First, read the following dialogue out loud with your tutor, then switch roles and try again. 

Dorothy and Kevin are talking about how to ask for help.

Kevin: Dorothy, could you help me for a second?
Dorothy: Okay, no problem. I can help you.
Kevin: I’m trying to think more ways you can ask for help. Do you think you can ask around?
Dorothy: One way is to ask, “Do you have a minute?
Kevin: That’s a good one. I use,  “I need your help, please.”
Dorothy: The other day someone asked me, “Could you do me a favor?
Kevin: Yes, it’s good to ask in a nice way. My friend says, “Can you lend me a hand?
Dorothy: You can also say, “I need some assistance, please.”
Kevin: There’s a lot of ways to ask for help. Here’s an easy one: “Can you help me?
Dorothy: I think you know now plenty of ways to ask for help!

Vocabulary

Go over the following vocabulary and expressions with your tutor. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Could you help me for a second? (complete sentence) to ask for help in a question
okay, no problem (phrase) a response to someone asking for help
ask around (v – phrase) ask a lot of people for information or help
We need to ask around to find a bank.
Do you have a minute? (complete sentence) to ask for help in a question
I need your help, please. (complete sentence) to ask for help, but not in a question
Could you do me a favor? (complete sentence) to ask for help in a question
Can you lend me a hand? (complete sentence) to ask for help in a question
I need some assistance, please. (complete sentence) to ask for help, but not in a question
Can you help me? (complete sentence) to ask for help in a question * could is more polite than can
ask for (v – phrase) try to get information, help, or permission
Please, ask for help.

Exercise

Practice answering the following questions with your tutors. You can use the sample answers to come up with your own answer. Use the sentences and phrases you learned above.

  1. How would you ask someone to help you move from one home to another?
    1. I’m moving tomorrow. Could you lend me a hand?
    2. Next month I will move into another apartment. I need your help, please.
    3. Your answer:
  2. How would you ask a friend to help you study for a test?
    1. I have a math test tomorrow. I need help to study tonight. Can you help me?
    2. I’m nervous about our English test. Could you help me study for it?
    3. Your answer:
  3. You are sick with the flu. How would you ask your spouse to get you some water?
    1. Can you do me a favor? Get me some more water, please.
    2. I need some assistance, please. I need water, please.
    3. Your answer:
  4. How would you ask around for help?
    1. I’m trying to find the zoo. Can you tell me where it is?
    2. I’m lost. Could you tell me where the supermarket is?
    3. Your answer:
  5. Your kitchen sink leaks water. How would you ask your brother for help to fix it?
    1. Do you have a minute? I need help to fix the kitchen sink.
    2. Could you help me for a second, please? My sink leaks water.
    3. Your answer:

Conversation

Use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  1. Why should people ask for help politely?
  2. Tell me about a time you asked for help.
  3. What are some ways to tell someone you can’t help them? (For example: Ok, no problem.)
  4. What are some other reasons people ask for help?
  5. Sometimes people don’t like to ask for help. Why?

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

 

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Lesson 24: Expressing Excitement

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Dialogue

In this lesson, your tutor will help you go over this topic: excitement. First, read the following dialogue out loud with your tutor, then switch roles and try again. 

Kevin and Dorothy are talking about excitement.

Kevin:
I’m fired up, Dorothy!
Dorothy:
Why are you so enthusiastic?
Kevin:
I’m going to buy a Porsche tomorrow. The excitement is building.
Dorothy:
Oh my gosh! I can’t wait to go for a ride in it.
Kevin:
I’m on the edge of my seat! It’s going to be so exciting to drive it.
Dorothy:
I’m thrilled for you!
Kevin:
This is like a dream come true. What about you? Is there any excitement in your life?
Dorothy:
I’m charged up because I probably will go on a 4-week vacation to Europe!
Kevin:
I’m sure you are eager to go.
Dorothy:
I can’t wait to see some breathtaking views of the mountains.

Vocabulary

Go over the following vocabulary and expressions with your tutor. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

fired up (verb phrase) to make some become excited or angry
They are fired up for vacation.
enthusiastic (adj) feeling or showing strong excitement
He’s enthusiastic for school to start.
the excitement is building (complete sentence) excitement is getting stronger or more intense
The excitement is building! I will buy a new house next week.
oh my gosh (expression) people say it when they are excited or surprised; OMG
Oh my gosh! I’m getting married.
on the edge of my seat (idiom) very excited and giving full attention to something
I’m on the edge of my seat watching this movie.
thrilled (adj) feeling very excited
We are thrilled that you are going out to eat with us.
dream come true (expression) something you wanted very much for a long time; it finally happens
It was a dream come true when I won $1 million.
charged up (verb phrase) excited and full of energy
She could not sleep because she was charged up about her wedding tomorrow.
eager (adj) very excited and interested; a strong desire to do something
He is eager to go out on his first date.
breathtaking (adj) exciting,, surprising, or beautiful
The view of the sunset is breathtaking.

Exercise

Practice answering the following questions with your tutors. You can use the sample answers to come up with your own answer.

  1. How would you express excitement if you were accepted into a university?
    1. This is like a dream come true.
    2. I’m thrilled that I got accepted into the university.
    3. Your answer:
  2. How would you express excitement if you won $1 million?
    1. I’m fired up! I just won $1 million.
    2. Oh my gosh! I can’t believe it.
    3. Your answer:
  3. How would you express excitement if you were going on a dream vacation?
    1. I’m charged up for my vacation to Tahiti!
    2. I’m eager to go on my dream vacation.
    3. Your answer:
  4. How would you express excitement if you were watching an exciting movie?
    1. I’m on the edge of my seat! This movie is intense.
    2. The movie is awesome! I’m happy we came to see it.
    3. Your answer:
  5. How would you express excitement if you scored high on your IELTS exam?
    1. Oh my gosh! I’m thrilled. I finally achieved the score I needed.
    2. I’m charged up! I feel so good about my IELTS results.
    3. Your answer:

Conversation

Use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  1. What are you enthusiastic about?
  2. What would be a dream come true for you? Why?
  3. What do people do in your city for excitement?
  4. Which was more exciting, getting your driver’s license or graduating from high school? Why?
  5. Which is more exciting to you, winning a sports car or a new house? Why?

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

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