Writing Resume Part 5: Styling

Before the lesson, make sure you have sent your resume to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system. You can send an attachment by clicking the following button when you are logged on to Cambly’s website.

If you haven’t finished Part 1, please finish Part 4 first.

This following content has been modified from ResumeGenius. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Step 3: How to Style your Resume

Whew! So the hard part is over. You have all your content typed up and you are feeling confident about getting that interview. Now for the finishing touches. It’s time to give it some personality.

I. # of Pages

This is the most argued point of resume writing. Some professionals vigorously discourage applicants from going over one page, while others argue that in some instances it is acceptable. The bottom line is this: if you have information that is highly relevant to the position you are applying for then go ahead and add an extra page. However, if you are just adding fluff for the sake of adding pages, then your resume will suffer.

II. Font and Sizing Dos and Don’ts

Font style and size is largely dependent on your preference. You can never be sure what the hiring manager prefers so you have to go with your gut. However there are some Dos and Don’ts when it comes to choosing your font and sizes.

Dos

  • Choose easy-to-read fonts
  • Use the same font throughout
  • Change sizes in descending order for your name, headers, and bullet points
  • Choose a font that fits with the text sizes you’ve chosen

Don’ts

  • Don’t choose small sizes to fit everything on one page
  • Don’t pick wacky fonts (for heavens sake not Wing Dings!)
  • Don’t have one uniform text size throughout
  • Don’t go below 9pt
  • Don’t spend too much time on choosing a font

For sizing, many resumes follow a 24, 12, 10 format. This means that the name is 24pt, the body headers are 12pt, and the bullet points are 10pt.

If the hiring manager needs to put on their glasses just to make out your experience, then your application will be on one-way trip to the trash can.

This is by no means a rule, but rather a guideline to consider following. Just remember to keep the readability in mind when choosing sizes. If the hiring manager needs to put on their glasses just to make out your experience, then your application will be on one-way trip to the trash can.
When choosing your font, the choice will come down to a “Serif” style or a “Sans Serif” style. The major difference is that Serif fonts have small lines on the ends of their letters, while the Sans Serif does not. Again, the choice is based on your preference of what you think will be the easiest for a potential employer to read.

It’s worth noting whether your resume is a paper version or an electronic version. For a paper version it’s better to use Serif fonts, while electronic versions look better in Sans Serif fonts. Below are some popular font choices.

Serif Fonts:

  • Times New Roman
  • Georgia
  • Bookman Old Style
  • Century Gothic
San Serif Fonts:

  • Arial
  • Helvetica
  • Tahoma
  • Calibri

III. Lines

Lines are great to use to help break up the resume and allow potential employers to better process the information. Line breaks commonly begin after the career objective or qualifications summary. From there, they are used to break each subsequent section. How you divide it is up to you, but just don’t go page break crazy for every bit of information. Too many page breaks will ruin its readability.

Below are some line styles for you to consider (see the yellow highlights):

lines example

Line Styling Sample 1

lines example

Line Styling Sample 2

lines sample

Line Styling Sample 3

IV. Margins

Margins are the first thing a potential employer will notice about your resume, so it’s important that they are appropriately set. One inch margins are the safe bet for applicants that lack experience. If you have a wealth of experience that you are trying to fit to one page then it is acceptable to reduce to the margins. Be cautious when reducing the margins. If they are too small, your pages will look overcrowded. To be safe it is recommended not to go below .5.”

You’ve made it! Give yourself a pat on the back. Hopefully by now you are well on your way to writing an outstanding resume.


Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Let’s go over the following points with your tutor:
    • # of pages
    • Fonts do’s and don’ts
    • Readability
    • Lines
    • Margins
  • Revise your contact information according to the guideline above.
  • Do a final revision with your tutor.
  • You’ve made it! Give yourself a pat on the back. Now let’s move onto “Writing A Cover Letter”.

Writing Resume Part 4: Additional Sections

Before the lesson, make sure you have sent your resume to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system. You can send an attachment by clicking the following button when you are logged on to Cambly’s website.

If you haven’t finished Part 1, please finish Part 3 first.

This following content has been modified from ResumeGenius. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

V. Additional Sections

By now you’ve already added the nuts and bolts to your resume. Below are a few sections you may want to consider adding to help strengthen it.

Certifications/Licenses

certifications sample
Sample Certifications Section

The certifications section is the most important of the other sections you can include, but adding a certifications or licenses section is largely dependent on your industry. For example, the nursing field has strict licensing requirements while the customer service sector does not.

If your industry requires certifications the hiring manager will be intent on finding them in your application. Make sure to thoroughly research your industry to find any relevant certifications or licenses you may have missed.

Publications

Adding a publications sections is pertinent for graduate students who have published articles that are relevant to the job they are applying to. List your articles in reverse chronological order by publishing date. Choose the referencing style that is appropriate to your discipline. It also acceptable to add works that have yet to be published. You may label these as “Works in Progress” or “Submitted for Publication.” Here is an example of how a publications sections should be formatted.

Awards/Honors/Activities

awards sample
Sample Awards Section

This section adds another layer of customization to your resume by providing evidence of your abilities. Adding relevant awards and activities helps you stand out from your competition. If this section becomes too lengthy, feel free to break them up into smaller sections. Here are some items to consider adding:

  • Grants
  • Academic Honors
  • Scholarships
  • Volunteer positions
  • Professional Affiliations

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Have you included all the information for your additional section?
    • Certifications/Licenses
    • Publications
    • Awards/Honors/Activities
    • Technical skills
    • Additional skills
  • Revise your contact information according to the guideline above.
  • Make sure you have finished this step before moving onto Part 5.

Writing Resume Part 3: Experience & Education

Before the lesson, make sure you have sent your resume to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system. You can send an attachment by clicking the following button when you are logged on to Cambly’s website.

If you haven’t finished Part 1, please finish Part 2 first.

This following content has been modified from ResumeGenius. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

III. Professional Experience

The section is the core of your resume, where you are tasked with proving the skills you have listed in the qualifications summary or career objective. When it comes to labeling this section some use “Relevant Experience,” or “Work Experience” as an alternative to “Professional Experience.”

Remember to list your work experiences in reverse chronological order and only list experience that is relevant to the job you are applying for. For each company create a heading including the company’s name, city & state, your title, and the dates of employment (month and year). If you are still currently working at a company, you can simply write “month, year-Present” for the employment dates.

A general rule is that each experience have around 3-5 bullet points of your main duties and achievements.

3 Parts of a strong bullet point:

  • 1st: Action Verb (should always be first)
  • 2nd: Quantifiable Point
  • 3rd: Specific and relevant job duty

Example #1:

Trained 5+ cashiers, managing their cash limits and guaranteeing quality customer service at all times.

Example #2:(Note that the Quantifiable Point does not need to come immediately after the action verb)

Spearheaded the development of the first media kit amalgamation for all company projects, increasing national sales by 8%.

The above bullet points are great examples because they use action verbs to help to snatch the attention of hiring managers. Here is an endless list of action verbs to help get some inspiration. When writing your past experiences don’t forget to write your action verbs in past tense.

Adding a quantifiable or measurable point to each experience will give the hiring manager confidence in your abilities.In addition each of your job duties should be specific and listed by decreasing importance.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Make sure you have all the information for each company.
    • the company’s name
    • city & state
    • your title
    • the dates of employment (month and year)
  • Go over each line for main duties and achievements. Check whether you have included the following points and revise:
    • Action Verb (should always be first)
    • Quantifiable Point
    • Specific and relevant job duty

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

IV. Education

Having a solid education section helps to display the foundation of your knowledge and expertise. Depending on your professional experience, you may want to consider switching the order of the professional experience and education sections.

For instance, college or high school students that lack seasoned professional experience benefit from emphasizing their education by placing it before the professional experience section. In addition, if you possess a wealth of professional experience then it is appropriate to keep this section short and sweet.

Here are the main points to include in your education section:

  • The names of your university, community college, or technical school(Don’t include high school unless you did not attend college)
  • Location of the schools (city, state)
  • Date of graduation (month, year)
  • Degree(s)
  • GPA (only include if your GPA is above 3.0, round up to the first decimal place , and use this format: GPA: 3.5/4.0)

Here are three examples of how you can format an education section (pay attention to the yellow highlighted areas):

Professional-Education-Sample

Education Sample 1- High School Graduate

Education Sample 2

Education Sample 2- Community College

Education Sample 3

Education Sample 3- University Graduate

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Have you included all the information for your education section?
    • The names of your university, community college, or technical school
    • Location of the schools
    • Date of graduation
    • Degree(s)
    • GPA
  • Revise your contact information according to the guideline above.
  • Make sure you have finished this step before moving onto Part 4.

Writing Resume Part 2: Contact & Intro

Before the lesson, make sure you have sent your resume to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system. You can send an attachment by clicking the following button when you are logged on to Cambly’s website.

If you haven’t finished Part 1, please finish Part 1 first.

This following content has been modified from ResumeGenius. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

The Order of Information

Before delving into what information you should add, it’s important to remember that the information you include will largely depend on the format you choose. With that being said, below is a general guide to what information you should add and the order in which you should add it.

I. Contact Information

The contact information section is pretty self-explanatory. This section does not require a label (Contact Information or Contact Details). When listing your contact details you should follow this order:

  • Name (largest font on page, middle initial is optional)
  • Mailing Address
  • Telephone Number (Check that you have an appropriate voicemail message)
  • Email Address (make sure it’s appropriate, don’t use your sexypanda45@gmail.com account.)
  • Link to online portfolio (optional, ensure it is relevant to the position)
  • LinkedIn Profile

Here are 3 different examples of how you can format your contact information section (pay attention to the yellow highlights):

Contact Info 5

Professional Format

Contact-Information-sample

Classic Format

Contact-Information-Sample

Executive Format

Also, be careful not to accidentally add the contact information in the header as applicant tracking systems may not be able to read it.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Discuss which contact format suits your situation the best.
  • Revise your contact information according to the guideline above.

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

II. Choose a Resume Introduction

Like formats, job seekers have 3 choices for their resume introduction: a qualifications summary, career objective, and professional profile. The goal of all three are to gain the attention of an employer by highlighting your skills and experience that will help their company. However, the method through which each introduction achieves this goal differs. See below:

Qualifications Summary

With regards to format, the qualifications summary is a bullet point list (ranging from 4 to 6 points) of your most outstanding career achievements. Avoid using generic statements and try to list your skills in a way reflects your unique voice.

Qualifications Summary Example

I should use if:

  • I am applying to a job that requires a rigid set of abilities.
  • I have a wealth of experience in the industry.
  • I possess multiple skill sets.

I shouldn’t use if:

  • I lack experience.
  • I am an entry level candidate that lacks specific skill sets.
  • I lack measurable achievements.

Career Objective

A resume objective, also referred to as a career objective, is a 2-3 sentence statement that provides an overview of your skills and experience. This resume introduction is best for entry-level candidates.

Career Objective Example

I should use if:

  • I am an entry-level applicant.
  • I do not have in-depth experience in the industry.
  • I am a recent college graduate.

 

I shouldn’t use if:

  • I have a wealth of industry-specific skill sets.
  • I am changing career paths.
  • I am writing a cover letter.

Professional Profile

The professional profile is a combination of both the career objective and qualifications summary. It is also the most flexible of the three styles as it can be formatted as short paragraph of bullet-point list.

Professional-Profile-Example

I should use if:

  • I have had major achievement in my past experience
  • I am applying to a position in the same industry
  • I have a special area of expertise in my field

I shouldn’t use if:

  • I am an entry-level applicant
  • I am recent college graduate
  • I lack measurable of accomplishments

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Discuss which introduction format suits your situation the best.
  • Revise your contact information according to the guideline above.
  • Make sure you have finished this step before moving onto Part 3.

Writing Resume Part 1: Formatting

Before the lesson, make sure you have sent your resume to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system. You can send an attachment by clicking the following button when you are logged on to Cambly’s website.

If you are not familiar with how to write a resume in English, you can download the following template as a guideline:

This following content has been modified from ResumeGenius. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

First, let’s review what a resume isn’t.

  • It isn’t a log of your job history.
  • It isn’t a summary of skills.
  • It isn’t going to automatically get you a job.

Think of your resume this way: It’s an advertisement, and YOU are the product. Your goal is to get hiring managers to buy into what you’re selling – which means giving you an interview. To accomplish that, you need to see it as your marketing tool, your trusty belt buckle of tricks. Without it you are powerless. However, simply having a one isn’t enough to get you an interview.

When you finish with your resume, don’t forget to write a matching cover letter. Download one of our cover letter templates and get started.

Think about it — everyone has advertisements. Why should anyone buy into yours? Hiring managers have the difficult task of wading through the ads to find the right fit for their company.

Much like the flashing neon signs along the Vegas Strip, hiring managers are attracted to well-formatted resumes with attention-grabbing details. Studies show that, “8 out of 10 resumes are discarded with only a 10 second glance.” So in order stand out from the crowd it’s important that yours markets your skills in a way that demonstrates that you can successfully perform the duties of the job.

To help you do this, we’ve written easy-to-follow steps on how to write a resume. Before we get into the steps it should be noted that there is no certified way to write one. There are some who insist otherwise, but even certified professional resume writers will admit that, “a guiding principle of the résumé writing profession is that there are no hard and fast rules.” With that being said, below are some tips and guidelines to help you write one that best presents your career goals.

Step 1: Choose From 3 Formats

So you are staring at a blank page on your computer wondering, “Where do I start?” Hundreds ask this same question every day and the reason is most likely due to the fact that there is no standard rule for formatting a resume.

Your formatting decision comes down to 3 choices: Reverse-Chronological, Functional, and Combination. Each format has their own advantages and disadvantages. Below, you will find which one is best for you.

I. Reverse-Chronological

This is the more traditional format and is what you are most likely to come across. Chronological format is flexible and can be used for applicants with any level of experience.

Student Reverse Chronological Resume Sample

I should use if:

  • I want to show a vertical career progression.
  • I want to apply to a job in a similar field.
  • I want to promote my upward career mobility

I shouldn’t use if:

  • I have major gaps in my employment history.
  • I am changing my career path.
  • I change jobs every few months.

II. Functional

While chronological places emphasis on career progression, a functional format focuses on your abilities and skills. Since it heavily emphasizes the applicant’s qualifications, functional format is more suitable for those with an expert level of experience.

Waiter-Functional-Resume

I should use if:

  • I have gaps in my employment history.
  • I am changing my career industry.
  • I want to highlight a specific skill set.

I shouldn’t use if:

  • I want to highlight my upward career mobility.
  • I am an entry level candidate that lacks experience.
  • I lack transferable skills

III. Combination

As you can probably guess the combination format merges bits and pieces from both chronological and functional formats. Like the functional format, it focuses on specific qualifications, yet the body of the document contains professional experience similar to chronological format. This format is generally reserved for those with a great deal of experience in a particular industry.

waitress-combination-resume-sample

I should use if:

  • I want to highlight a developed skill set within a specific career.
  • I want to change my career path.
  • I am a master of the subject I am applying to.

I shouldn’t use if:

  • I want to highlight my education.
  • I lack experience.
  • I am an entry level candidate.

If you are still not sure what format is best for you, then check out our in-depth resume format guide.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Discuss which format suits your current situation and goals.
  • Choose the format from the 3 mentioned above.
  • Reorganize the information in your resume.
  • Make sure you have finished this step before moving onto Part 2.

2-44. If you had called me, I could’ve picked you up

insert image here (ratio 2:1 if possible)

Warm-up

Repeat after the tutor. 

  • If I had had money, I would’ve helped you.
  • If you had kissed me, I would’ve punched you.
  • If he had stayed here, he wouldn’t have died.
  • If you had come to the cafe, you could’ve seen Brad Pitt.
  • If he had protected me, I could’ve been safe.
  • If he hadn’t taught me, I couldn’t have mastered English.
  • If I hadn’t called her, she would’ve been late.
  • If we hadn’t been tired, we wouldn’t have slept.
  • If you hadn’t helped us, we couldn’t have finished this.
  • If I hadn’t studied hard, I couldn’t have passed this test.
  • If I had had money, I would’ve bought this boat.
  • If you had touched my boyfriend, I would’ve hit you.
  • If she had had time, she would’ve helped us.
  • If you had promoted me, I would’ve been happy.
  • If he had fired us, we would’ve been sad.

Notes

Here are some grammar tips. 

Vocabulary

Go over the following vocabulary and expressions with your tutor. Use the illustration above if needed.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
Come apart (phrasal verb) to break into parts or pieces
e.g. an old house that is coming apart at the seams
Come around (phrasal verb) to start to accept and support something (such as an idea) after opposing it : to stop opposing or disagreeing with something or someone
e.g. She still says she won’t support us, but she’ll come around eventually.
Come as (phrasal verb) used to describe the effect that something has when people first learn about it
e.g. Their decision came as a surprise to me.
Come back (phrasal verb) to return to a place
e.g. I hope you’ll come back and see us again soon.
Come between (phrasal verb) to cause disagreement between (people or groups)
e.g. We shouldn’t let these problems come between us.
Come by (phrasal verb) to get or acquire (something)
e.g. A good job is hard to come by.
Come down (phrasal verb) to go to a lower level
e.g. It’s sad to see how he has come down in the world.
Come down on (phrasal verb) to criticize or punish (someone)
e.g. The governor has promised to come down hard on corrupt officials.
Come down to (phrasal verb) to have (something) as the most important part
e.g. It’s nice to be rich, but when you come (right) down to it, it’s more important to be healthy and happy.
Come down with (phrasal verb) to begin to have or suffer from (an illness)
e.g. She came down with [=contracted] measles.

Exercise

Go over the following exercise with your tutors. 

  1. Make a sentence.
    1. touched / had / if / my / boyfriend / you /, /would’ve / I / hit / you / .
    2. had / you / me / promoted / if / , / been / I / would’ve / happy / .
    3. again / they / if / tried / had / , / the / won / could’ve / they / game / .
    4. helped / I / if / her / hadn’t / , /the / she / test / failed / could’ve / .
    5. if / helped / you / hadn’t / I / , / your / couldn’t/   business / have / you / started / .
  2. Correct the following sentences. 
    1. If I had had money, I would’ve buy this boat. 
    2. If he had fired us, we would’ve sad.
    3. If you had came to my party, you could’ve seen the singer.
    4. If I had find a job, I wouldn’t have come back.
    5. If I hadn’t met Master Eugene, I didn’t have mastered English.
  3. Answer the following questions.
    1. question1
    2. question2
    3. question3
  4. (Homework) Write a paragraph.
    1. Write 10 sentences using the grammar you learned today.
    2. Bone of contention: Pick a contentious issue about which you care deeply — it could be the same-sex marriage debate, or just a disagreement you’re having with a friend. Write a post defending the opposite position, and then reflect on what it was like to do that.
    3. Menagerie: Do you have animals in your life? If yes, what do they mean to you? If no, why have you opted not to?

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

2-43. If you were my girlfriend, I would be happy

insert image here (ratio 2:1 if possible)

Warm-up

Repeat after the tutor. 

  • If I were you, I would hate myself.
  • If you were not my sister, I would hate you.
  • If I had money, I would buy a building in Gangnam.
  • If I were a tiger, I could run really fast.
  • If we lived in Mars, we could be free.
  • If Candice were my daughter, I would be proud of her.
  • If today were the last day, we would be sad.
  • If you had a son, your life wouldn’t be easy.
  • If she had a pink dress, she could wear it tonight.
  • If I were a woman, would I be happy?
  • If I were a bird, I could fly to the sky.
  • If I were rich, I could buy this Ferrary.
  • If I were Korean, I could speak Korean.
  • If I were funny, I could become a comedian.
  • If I were 21, I could drink beer.

Notes

Here are some grammar tips. 

Vocabulary

Go over the following vocabulary and expressions with your tutor. Use the illustration above if needed.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
Mars (n) the planet that is fourth in order from the sun
proud (ad) very happy and pleased because of something you have done, something you own, someone you know or are related to, etc. : feeling pride
e.g. I was proud that I never gave in.
tuxedo (n) a formal suit for a man
especially : a formal black suit worn with a white shirt and a black bow tie
Come about (phrasal verb) to happen
e.g. Their meeting came about by accident/chance.
Come across (phrasal verb) to meet or find (something or someone) by chance
e.g. Researchers have come across important new evidence.
Come after (phrasal verb) to chase (someone) : to try to find or capture (someone you want to hurt or punish)
e.g. They’re worried that the government might be coming afterthem.
Come again (phrasal verb) used to ask someone to repeat something that was not heard or understood clearly
e.g. “Her name is Hermione.” “Come again? I didn’t quite hear you.” “I said her name is Hermione.”
Come along (phrasal verb) to go somewhere with someone
e.g. I’m going to the museum tomorrow. Would you like to come along?
Come a long way (phrasal verb) to rise to a much higher level of success : to become very successful
e.g. He’s come a long way from his days as a young reporter. Now he’s one of the country’s most respected journalists.
Come and go (phrasal verb) used to talk about time that has passed
e.g. More than a hundred years have come and gone since the day of that famous battle.

Exercise

Go over the following exercise with your tutors. 

  1. Make a sentence.
    1. I / 21 / if / were / , / drink / could / I / beer / .
    2. were / if / men / we / , / could / we / them/ understand /.
    3. if / skinny / were / I / , / skinny / wear / would / I / jeans / .
    4. you / if / tall / were / , / be / you / more / would / popular / .
    5. loved / if / she / you  / , / you / wouldn’t / she / to / lie / .
  2. Correct the following sentences. 
    1. If I am a bird, I could fly to the sky.
    2. If I were rich, I can buy this Ferrari.
    3. If I were fun, I could become a comedian.
    4. If I lived in France, I could visit to Paris.
    5. If I had money, I won’t leave San Diego.
  3. Answer the following questions.
    1. question1
    2. question2
    3. question3
  4. (Homework) Write a paragraph.
    1. Write 10 sentences using the grammar you learned today.
    2. Comfort zone: What are you more comfortable with — routine and planning, or laissez-faire spontaneity?
    3. Show and tell: You’ve been asked to do a five-minute presentation to a group of young schoolchildren on the topic of your choice. Describe your presentation.

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.