Interview 15: What Are You Looking For In A New Position?

For the best result, make sure you have read this article and already have a write-up of your answer prior to your Cambly session. You can send a longer text to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system.

This following content has been modified from LiveCareer. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

What the Hiring Manager Is Really Asking…

With the question, “What are you looking for in a new position?” your interviewer wants to know why you’re applying for the position and what you’re looking for in your job search.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Think about why you are applying for a position.
  • How do you tend to speak of previous employers?
  • What motivates you about a particular position?

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Points to Emphasize

For an effective response, follow these tips:

  • Describe your current or last employer positively.
  • Be clear in your reason for leaving.
  • Support your response with positive examples.
  • Connect what the new job offers with what you miss in your current position.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • How could you describe your previous employer in a positive way?
  • What is your reason for leaving your current position?
  • What does this new job offer that you’re missing in your current role?

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Mistakes You Should Avoid

Watch out for these mistakes in your response:

  • Don’t be too vague.
  • Don’t be disrespectful of your current company.
  • Don’t lead with personal reasons for leaving.
  • Don’t be overly sad about leaving.
  • Don’t make the interviewer question if you’ve really thought through your decisions.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • What specific examples could you include in your response?
  • How can you maintain respect for your current company?
  • What reason could you begin your response with?

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Sample Answer

Here’s an example of the question, “What are you looking for in a new position?”

I really enjoy the challenges and teamwork of my current job and I think I have grown my management skills. However, my hour and a half commute has become taxing. I want a position that is closer and where I can use and continue to develop my skills.

 

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Write the first draft of your answer with your tutor.
  • Are there any words or phrases that you are not comfortable pronouncing?
  • Now rehearse with your tutor until you are comfortable answering the question without the script.

Interview 37: A Challenge Or Conflict At Work

For the best result, make sure you have read this article and already have a write-up of your answer prior to your Cambly session. You can send a longer text to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system.

This following content has been modified from LiveCareer. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

What the Hiring Manager Is Really Asking…

This is actually one of the better interview questions asked, both for the interviewee and the interviewer, and there are a couple of reasons why:

  1. It’s a solid, basic, open-ended question that an interviewer can ask any candidate.
  2. When asked properly, the question can surprise candidates, as opposed to other questions which are easier to anticipate and prepare answers for.
  3. It allows the interviewer to get a handle on how a candidate responds in a situation that doesn’t have a clear, easy, yes-or-no answer.
  4. When an interviewer gets a handle on this, they then know how a candidate will most likely respond to unforeseen challenges and difficult situations in the role they’re interviewing for.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Why do you think it’s beneficial to talk about something that gave you trouble in an interview?
  • What do you think the interviewer is looking for in this question?

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

The Best Way to Respond

One straightforward way to respond to interview questions about difficult situations at work is to use the STAR technique.

  • Situation/Task: Describe the challenging situation/task that you needed to deal with.
  • Action: What action(s) did you take to remedy things? Be specific.
  • Results: What were the results of your action(s)? What would have happened if you hadn’t reacted that way?

While following this simple formula, you’ll also want to focus on aspects related to your reasoning, integrity, or initiative, or your ability to reach out to superiors when you don’t know the answer. For example:

  • Talking about an ethical dilemma in which you chose to act with integrity.
  • Discussing your initiative in tackling a difficult situation to a positive end.
  • Discussing how you worked through a dilemma and found a solution.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • What are the benefits of answering this question with the STAR technique?
  • Think of a few instances where you handled a difficult situation
  • Write a response for this using STAR

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Mistakes You Should Avoid

If you haven’t thought this question through ahead of time (and you really should), there’s a good chance that you may not be able to think of something off the top of your head. Here are some things to avoid speaking about when answering this question.

  • Don’t speak poorly of former or current companies or co-workers.
  • Don’t be self-focused to the point of discussing yourself in a superior light.
  • Avoid discussing your own shortcomings . . . unless you also mention your growth.
  • Don’t choose a situation that isn’t job-related unless you have no work experience.

Your potential employer wants to know that you can effectively work through a difficult situation on the job, so be sure to avoid a self-deprecating attitude. While people love self-deprecating humor in real life, the short time span of a job interview really isn’t the time for it. Take the question seriously, and answer it seriously.

If the interviewer asks about a situation you’ve never had to deal with, it’s okay to say so, but they can then easily change the question to “How WOULD you deal with a difficult situation like that?” In other words, they can switch from the historical to the hypothetical, which makes the question a lot harder all of a sudden.

With that in mind, the best follow-up response would be to say “That’s never happened to me, but if that kind of situation did come up, here’s how I would handle it . . . .” And from there, you apply the STAR technique.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • How did handling that situation make you a better employee?
  • Was there anything you felt that you could have improved upon? What steps have you taken to do so?
  • How does the way you handle difficult situations make you uniquely qualified for this job?

Guideline

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Sample Answer

“During a summer session I had a student who was writing rude, offensive notes on student papers during peer grading assignments. I arranged a meeting with the student, and had my principal attend too, as a witness. I calmly yet firmly informed the student that the types of comments she was providing weren’t helpful—that they were in fact detrimental. From there, the three of us had a fruitful discussion on the types of comments that work best on student papers. In the end, the student walked away with a solid understanding of how to provide constructive, non-offensive feedback to other students.”

“Late one Friday afternoon at my last job, a client called with an urgent question about the project we were working on for them. My boss usually handles all client contact directly, but he had already left for the weekend. I explained the situation to the client, and said that although I might not know the exact answer to the question, that I was also working on the project and might be able to help. That was good enough for the client, and while it was true that I didn’t have the answer immediately, we were able to work through it together fairly quickly, and the client got off the call assured that they wouldn’t need to worry about the issue over the weekend. I also left a note for my boss about the call, so that he could check with the client on his return on Monday morning.”

PS: If you’re still struggling with getting calls back for interviews, LiveCareer can help. Put our resume builder or resume examples to use and craft a top-notch resume in no time at all. Also consider our cover letter builder if you’re stuck on how to best craft one that complements your resume.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Write the first draft of your answer with your tutor.
  • Are there any words or phrases that you are not comfortable pronouncing?
  • Now rehearse with your tutor until you are comfortable answering the question without the script.

Interview 36: What Motivates You?

For the best result, make sure you have read this article and already have a write-up of your answer prior to your Cambly session. You can send a longer text to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system.

This following content has been modified from LiveCareer. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

What the Hiring Manager Is Really Asking…

Even the simplest interview questions usually have some hidden meaning behind them. The information the interviewer is trying to uncover is not always apparent, but if you are able to recognize what they are really asking, your answers will benefit you in the interview.

There are few questions simpler than, “What motivates you?”. Yet this deceptively simple question has some hidden meaning. The specifics of how you are motivated are not important; the interviewer is interested in whether you are able to motivate yourself. They want to make sure that you will be able to work without a manager’s supervision if you are hired.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Why is there a distinction between how you are motivated, and if you can motivate yourself? Why does an employer care about this?
  • Think of a time when you have been particularly motivated in the past.
  • What led you to be so motivated?

Guideline

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Points to Emphasize

Because the specifics are less important, there are many ways to answer this question. The following points should help you nail down what really matters.

  • Communicate that you are self-motivated. It is important that you are able to perform on your own. It is beneficial to the company if managers do not have to make an effort to motivate the employees.
  • Be honest and sincere. Think about what actually motivates you. There are many acceptable answers, as long as it translates to hard work, but you should never make something up.
  • Be specific. Do not just say you are self motivated. You should point to success, satisfaction, or some other specific aspect as your source of motivation.
  • Be optimistic. A positive attitude creates a good impression.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • What strategies have you used to motivate yourself in the past?
  • Why are these strategies effective, and how would you bring them with you into this new work environment?
  • How do help motivate those around you?

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Mistakes You Should Avoid

You should choose your words carefully to avoid the interviewer thinking you are not motivated to work with them. Avoid these common mistakes.

  • Do not rush. Not giving your answer enough time makes it seem like you are not motivated.
  • Do not embellish your answer. It is not expected that you are totally motivated 100% of the time. You should just be able to always do your job properly.
  • You should not get your motivation from others. It is best if an employee can be responsible for their own motivation.
  • Do not choose your personal goals as your source of motivation, unless these goals are to communicate that you will work hard.

It may be acceptable if your motivation comes from advancing in the company.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Decide on one or two points to explain how you motivate yourself, and how you have used this skill effectively in the past
  • Would you consider motivation a particular skill? If so, highlight it.

Guideline

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Sample Answer

Your answer should incorporate specifics to the job you are applying for, but it may resemble this example.

“I am able to motivate myself. Instead of relying on managers or other superiors to encourage me, I find that achieving success drives me forward. The satisfaction I get from doing a job better than anyone around me keeps my work at a high level and my morale high, as well.”

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Write the first draft of your answer with your tutor.
  • Are there any words or phrases that you are not comfortable pronouncing?
  • Now rehearse with your tutor until you are comfortable answering the question without the script.

Interview 35: What Is Your Greatest Achievement Outside Of Work?

For the best result, make sure you have read this article and already have a write-up of your answer prior to your Cambly session. You can send a longer text to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system.

This following content has been modified from LiveCareer. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

What the Hiring Manager Is Really Asking…

When you go into a professional interview, the hiring manager may ask, “What is your greatest achievement outside of work” Interviewers ask this question because your response will reveal much about what motivates and inspires you. Hiring managers are not just interested in your resume. They want to find quality individuals that they can invest in and rely on. This question helps them find out if your mindset will work well with the company policies and your potential coworkers. View the achievement question as an opportunity to show your passion for personal growth and development.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Why do you think interviewers are looking for when they ask this question?
  • What do you consider milestones in your life? How did you manage to achieve them?
  • What key things have you learned from personal success?

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Points to Emphasize

When you recall a good memory, you will naturally relive the emotions you experienced when the event took place. This genuine response will shine through in the form of excitement. This real emotion is engaging, so don’t be afraid to let it show.

  • Choose something that you’ve done in the last 5 years.
  • Emphasize how the experience will help you be a good employee.
  • Include your motivation for accomplishing your goal.
  • Highlight qualities such as tenacity, focus and positive attitude.

Remember to stay positive and keep it professional. Even if your achievement was difficult, focus on the good to come out of the situation.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Was this achievement a personal accomplishment? How does it relate to your professional goals?
  • How did this achievement make you a better employee?
  • Think of five main qualities that contributed to this success

Guideline

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Mistakes You Should Avoid

In retrospect, people remember how you make them think and feel as opposed to your exact words. Thus, it is very important to be honest about which past event is most important to you.

  • Do not pick a work place achievement.
  • Do not choose an event that took place more than 5 years ago.
  • Do not focus on the negatives from the road to your past accomplishment.
  • Do not tell an anecdote that did not actually happen in your life.

Always keep your response professional. You are sharing a personal experience, but remain cognizant of where you are and the type of details that are appropriate in such a setting.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • To keep things concise, decide on one or two main steps to highlight when recounting your path to success
  • What inspired you to pursue success? How will you bring that into the workplace?
  • What is it about your success story that makes you stand out?

Guideline

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Sample Answer

Here is an example of a good answer to the greatest personal achievement question:

“In an effort to be healthier, I recently lost about 40 pounds and started training for a marathon. Over the past two years, I’ve changed everything from my diet to my hobbies. It was difficult initially, but now, I’m ready for my first marathon next month. I’ve never had a problem with accomplishing a goal, but now I know I intimately understand the power of determination.”

Remember, the hiring manager wants to find a good fit for the company, so don’t forget to sell what you bring to the company.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Write the first draft of your answer with your tutor.
  • Are there any words or phrases that you are not comfortable pronouncing?
  • Now rehearse with your tutor until you are comfortable answering the question without the script.

Interview 34: Describe An Important Project You Worked On

For the best result, make sure you have read this article and already have a write-up of your answer prior to your Cambly session. You can send a longer text to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system.

This following content has been modified from LiveCareer. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

What the Hiring Manager Is Really Asking…

One of the most common competency-based questions for any role requiring some project management experience is “Describe an important project you’ve worked on.” There are a few reasons why interviewers ask this question. They want to see how well you can manage a project or a situation, what your approach to dealing with challenges is, and how your skills would help you to successfully lead a project. They also want to know what your work ethic is like, and gain insight into how you handle stress. So how are you going to answer this question?

First, you need to prepare an answer in advance. It’s very hard to give a well thought-out, five-star answer if you haven’t done prep before your interview. To get started with prepping a response to this interview question, write out a list of all the important projects you’ve worked on in your career. Then, note what the goal was of each project, and what part you played in bringing each project across the finish line. Then, note the outcomes of all the projects.

The next step is to hone in on the project (or projects) you’ll discuss in an interview situation. Use the STAR method (Situation, Task, Action, Result) to create a concise (yet thorough) answer. Make sure your answer demonstrates your abilities with setting priorities, making decisions, hitting deadlines, and delegating tasks (if you’ve been in a management role). Below are some points to consider when preparing your answer.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Why do you think the STAR method is an effective way to answer this question?
  • Of these items, which do you think is most important to highlight in the interview? What do you think the employer is most looking for?

Guideline

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Choose the Right Example

Select a project you’ve worked on recently, and not one from several years ago. One of my coaching clients who was applying for a managing director role told me about an impressive achievement during a mock interview. When I asked him when the achievement took place, he said 10 years ago (!). It’s important that you focus on something more recent—you don’t want to give the impression that the last significant achievement in your career took place eons ago.

Also, make sure you pick a project that was actually successful (unless you want to talk about an unsuccessful project that you turned around and made a success). You don’t want to rattle off a bad example in an interview! I’ve heard many stories of candidates realizing halfway through their answer that they’ve chosen a bad example, and that the outcome they worked towards in the interview situation was actually a disastrous one.

Ideally, pick an example that’s most relevant to the responsibilities of the job you’re applying for.

Explain Your Role Clearly and Talk Tangible Outcomes

A common mistake that candidates make is saying “we” all the time when answering a question about an important project. It is okay to say “we” if you’ve managed a team, but make sure that you make your contribution to the project clear. What role did you play in its success? That’s what you need to emphasize.

Also, make sure you mention the tangible result of the project. If the work you did saved the company time or money, or took it to a new level in regards to its standing amongst competitors, well . . . go ahead and quantify your answer as much as possible! And if you earned rave reviews from a client, be sure to note their specific feedback. It’s also a good idea to mention what you learned from the project—both from the success and its challenges.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • What things are you most proud of in the projects that you’ve worked on?
  • What steps did you take that specifically helped the outcome of a successful project?
  • How would you bring these skills to this company? What is it about your leadership ability that helps you stand out?

Guideline

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Mistakes You Should Avoid

It can be easy to begin rambling about an important project or achievement from a current or previous position when in an interview situation. Stay clear and concise by avoiding these mistakes and pitfalls. Do not go into an interview situation without an answer to this question firmly planted in your head. As noted at the beginning of the article, you should write out a list of all the important projects you’ve worked on in your career, and detail how you contributed to their successful completions. Choose a past project that aligns with the job/industry you’re interviewing for.

Share your success, but avoid coming off as arrogant when you do so. Don’t focus on the contribution of others—the answer you provide should primarily be about you. Also, don’t focus on negatives, or talk about how you disliked the important project (if that is indeed the case).

Again, avoid talking about an unsuccessful project (unless—as previously mentioned—you want to talk about how you turned an unsuccessful project into a successful one).

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Why do you think it is important to find a balance between arrogance and confidence? What are some ways you can avoid seeming arrogant?
  • Apply the STAR method to a project that you think fits best with this interview you’re preparing for.
  • Why is this the project that you’re choosing?

Guideline

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Sample Answer

“I have worked on many important projects throughout my career. What’s really crucial for me when starting one is to get very clear on the goals right at the start and then create a plan with milestones. I also like dealing with the most difficult parts of the projects early on—that way in case there are any significant issues, I’ll still have a nice amount of time to complete before the deadline. I also typically break down large tasks into smaller chunks, so that it is easier to know where to start. Detailed planning is very important to ensure an important project goes smoothly. For example, last year I was in charge of . . . .”

From here, start explaining the project, first in terms of its purpose and objective, scope, complexity [e.g. working with new technology, number of resources, budget, and timeline] and the key challenge you needed to overcome. Show them that you can see not only the big picture but also all the little things that need to happen on a daily basis in order to get the project done.

Here’s another example of how to answer the question:

“In order to get project “X” completed in my previous job, I found out who the key stakeholders were and got their input on the project’s different parts. Then, I outlined the major milestones that would be involved in completing the project, and worked backwards to break down the work that would need to be done at each stage.

I created a list of all possible risks that might stop us from reaching those milestones, and I then added some extra time to the schedule in case anything unexpected came up. I also made sure that my role and responsibilities in the project were as clear as possible so I knew exactly what I had to do. The project was completed on time, but looking back, I realize there were some problems that could have been avoided. For example, I would have changed “Z” in order to avoid some of the minor scheduling problems we ran into. Having said that, it’s always easier to see what the learnings are after a project has been completed, and I now know what I’d do differently the next time.”

Remember your end goal with this question: to put yourself in the best possible light when explain your project management approach, and lessons learned from past important projects. Make sure you shine in the end, but don’t come off as an arrogant bragger. Don’t take all the credit if you worked on a collaborative project. Quantify the end results, if possible, and always make sure you share the outcome of the project’s completion. Good luck!

PS: If you’re still struggling with getting calls back for interviews, LiveCareer can help. Put our resume builder or resume examples to use and craft a top-notch resume in no time at all. And if you’re having a tough time with writing cover letters, check out our cover letter builder as well!

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Write the first draft of your answer with your tutor.
  • Are there any words or phrases that you are not comfortable pronouncing?
  • Now rehearse with your tutor until you are comfortable answering the question without the script.

Interview 38: Describe a Typical Work Week.

For the best result, make sure you have read this article and already have a write-up of your answer prior to your Cambly session. You can send a longer text to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system.

This following content has been modified from LiveCareer. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

What the Hiring Manager Is Really Asking…

When asking this question, what the interviewer is truly asking is for you to give examples to verify the skills and expertise that you listed in your resume or may have shared earlier in the interview process.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Do you think the interviewer is looking for a list of personal things, or professional ones? Why would this be?
  • Reflect on your usual week at work. How do you like to structure your time?
  • How do you approach all of the tasks that need to get done?

Guideline

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Points to Emphasize

It is a great idea to review your resume before entering the interview process. When answering the question, you will want to elaborate on skills you have previously shared while providing new examples.

  • Talk about the skills you have that you believe you will utilize most in the position.
  • Focus on experiences you have had utilizing those skills.
  • Paint your experience in a positive light.
  • If you received any awards or recognition through utilizing your skills, speak about them.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Write down the 10 most important components of your last job
  • Reflect on the list you’ve written, and try to select just 5 things that reflect a range of strengths and skills
  • Write down any awards or recognition you received at work, and the reasons for receiving them

Guideline

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Mistakes You Should Avoid

You want to recall your experiences as close to how you shared them previously, whether it was in your resume or verbally. It is important to maintain continuity to avoid it seeming like you may have lied previously.

  • Do not allude to the fact that you feel you have previously answered the question and try to breeze over it.
  • If you have several previous positions, do not try to talk about all of them; focus in on the one or two most relevant jobs.
  • Avoid sharing a laundry list of duties; paint a general picture of the skills you utilized on a regular basis.
    Steer away from any negative comments, unless you are speak of your conflict resolution skills.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Which of your past jobs is most relevant to the one you are now applying for?
  • How will you bring your work week strategy into this new setting?
  • What strategies for structure have served you the best in the past? Why?

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Sample Answer

A good answer to address your previous experience might sound something like:

“In a typical day in my last position I fulfilled management tasks of opening and closing the facility, as well as overseeing a staff of seven individuals. Throughout the day I completed various administrative duties as well, including answering phones, drafting documents and emails, filing and greeting customers. I also provided strong customer service and resolved customer issues.”

Utilize this question as a way to drive home the facts that you are aware of the skills necessary for the position, that you have those skills and that you have the experience to prove it.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Write the first draft of your answer with your tutor.
  • Are there any words or phrases that you are not comfortable pronouncing?
  • Now rehearse with your tutor until you are comfortable answering the question without the script.

Interview 33: Describe Your Work Style

For the best result, make sure you have read this article and already have a write-up of your answer prior to your Cambly session. You can send a longer text to your tutor through Cambly’s messaging system.

This following content has been modified from LiveCareer. See the original article here.


Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

What the Hiring Manager Is Really Asking…

When a hiring manager asks you questions about your work style, what they are really asking is how well you would fit in with the company culture and the job itself. While it may seem as if the employer is trying to determine whether or not you are a hard worker, they are often trying to decide whether you are a team player. If you are not, are you willing to adapt and partake in collaborative initiatives as the job demands. They are also using this information to determine how well you value the employee and employer relationship. Any answer you give needs to be carefully thought out to showcase your abilities to work independently and with others.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • How would you describe yourself as a worker?
  • What are your work habits?
  • How do you think your work habits contribute to your work style? What is the difference?

Guideline

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Points to Emphasize

When answering the question, your ability to articulate your work style takes center stage.

  • Be sure to let the interviewer know if you enjoy working alone or on a team.
  • Let the hiring manager know how you respond to feedback and criticism.
  • Emphasize any collaborative and independent work skills you have that pertain to the role you are applying for.
  • Any skills and abilities you have need to be stated in straightforward fashion.

Highlight any skills that are relevant to the question that portrays you as the best candidate for the job.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Pick five of your skills that you think are most relevant to this job?
  • How do these skills factor into your working style?
  • How do you think your work style makes you uniquely qualified for this job?

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Mistakes You Should Avoid

How well you explain your collaborative and independent abilities showcases your ability to think and communicate about yourself. To avoid answering this question the wrong way, prepare yourself before your interview. Avoid saying things like:

  • I prefer to work alone.
  • I’m a hard worker with good communication skills.
  • I go above and beyond to meet and exceed all work goals.
  • While I don’t prefer to work with others, I can and will do so as needed.

Hiring personnel want to see creativity, self-expression and honesty in your answers. Don’t over or undersell your abilities. Be truthful, thoughtful and prepared to describe your work style in a smart way to showcase how well you’d mesh with the job and work environment.

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Write down one positive thing you could say about your negative work habits (ex. if you take a long time to complete a task, you might be detail-oriented)
  • Think of the ways your work habits have improved over the years. What strategies did you use to become a better employee?
  • Bring the question back to your attributes; what is it about your work style that makes you the best candidate for the job?

Guideline

Read the following text with your tutor. 

Sample Answer

A great response to use for a tough work style question is:

“I am able to adapt to any workplace. I try to maintain a fast pace during my work shift to remain focused while completing my tasks. I strive to be efficient and strive to ensure all work is completed properly and without error. I work well on my own, but am more than happy to work with others for collaborations or team-based projects. I take my position seriously, and am completely dedicated and driven to succeed.”

Activities

Go over the following points with your tutors. 

  • Write the first draft of your answer with your tutor.
  • Are there any words or phrases that you are not comfortable pronouncing?
  • Now rehearse with your tutor until you are comfortable answering the question without the script.