Jewelry or Concert?

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • You have received a gift of money. The money is enough to buy either a piece of jewelry you like or tickets to a concert you want to attend. Which would you buy? Use specific reasons and details to support your answer.
    • What would make you want to choose the jewelry?
    • What would make you want to choose the tickets to a concert?
    • What would your family or friends want you to do?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
wealth (n) a large amount of money
What would you do with that amount of wealth?
budget (n) an estimate of income
He looked at his budget and realized it wouldn’t be possible.
affluent (adj) having a great deal of money
Her family was affluent, but she wanted to work for her money.
intuitive (adj) done based on intuition, one’s feeling
They had to make an intuitive decision on what to do with all the wealth they came away with.
experience (v) encounter an event
She wanted to experience life rather than accumulate things.
spend (v) pay out in buying goods or services
She couldn’t decide what to spend her money on.
blow off (expression) ignore
He blew her off when they were supposed to go shopping.
embark on (expression) start a project or journey
They were ready to embark on a great concert experience.
go back on (expression) break a promise
She couldn’t go back on what she told him she would get.
have sticky fingers (expression) be a shoplifter, thief
Since he didn’t have much money, he learned to get what he wanted by having sticky fingers.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“A little thought and a little kindness are often worth more than a great deal of money.”
― John Ruskin

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

New High School in Your Town

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • It has recently been announced that a new high school may be built in your community. Do you support or oppose this plan? Why? Use specific reasons and details in your answer
    • What would be some benefits to having a new high school in your community?
    • What would be some negatives to having a new high school in your community?
    • What could be a compromise between the two viewpoints?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
clique (n) small group of people with similar interests
Even teachers seemed to form their own cliques among their coworkers.
dispute (n) disagreement or argument
The teachers got into a heated dispute.
argumentative (adj) expressing diverging ideas
He came off as very argumentative in the discussion.
academic (adj) relating to learning
They just wanted a new academic building for their students.
renovate (v) return to a good state
The school would be renovated rather than totally rebuilt.
unveil (v) reveal or announce publically
They couldn’t wait to unveil the new park to the rest of the community.
approve of (expression) to agree with a decision
Does she approve of your actions?
belong to (expression) be a member of
They wanted to belong to the new school but they weren’t allowed to.
break away (expression) leave an organization
The other teachers decided to break away from the school and start their own.
get a run for one’s money (expression) receiving a challenge
The school dispute gave the principal a run for his money in having to make difficult decisions.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“Nothing in the universe can stop you from letting go and starting over.”
― Guy Finley

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Moving in Search of Another Place

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Some people spend their entire lives in one place. Others move a number of times throughout their lives, looking for a better job, house, community, or even climate. Which do you prefer: staying in one place or moving in search of another place? Use reasons and specific examples to support your opinion.
    • What are the benefits of living your entire life in one place?
    • What are the benefits of moving through their lives?
    • Is there a balance between always moving and staying in one place?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
prosperity (n) state of thriving, being prosperous
They sought out a life of prosperity for their family.
change (n) act of becoming different
He had a difficult time adapting to change.
established (adj) been in existence for a while
They had built and lived in their established home for decades.
alternative (adj) available as another option
Living in another state could be an alternative to quitting.
transfer (v) move from one place to another
The company transferred him to another state.
remain (v) stay in the place one has been occupying
The girl wanted to remain where she was.
stay put (expression) not move
She preferred to stay put in her hometown.
get across (expression) communicate effectively
They tried to get across the opportunities they would have if they moved.
have against (expression) disagree
He wondered what they had against moving another time.
rags to riches (expression) move from poverty to prosperity
She told the story of how they went from rags to riches with their hard work.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“Yesterday is not ours to recover, but tomorrow is ours to win or lose.”
― Lyndon B. Johnson

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Saving Money

Many bundles of US dollars bank notes

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Is it better to enjoy your money when you earn it or is it better to save your money for some time in the future? Use specific reasons and examples to support your opinion.
    • What are the benefits of saving money?
    • What are the benefits of enjoying your money when you earn it?
    • Is there a balance of enjoying and saving money?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
stockpile (n) large accumulation
Rather than investing he kept a stockpile of resources.
percentage (n) a proportion of a larger sum
She wondered what percentage she could save and still pay the bills.
frugal (adj) sparing or economical with money
By using coupons and finding sales, she was frugal with her money.
lavish (adj) very generous or extravagant
Their lavish grandmother always brought them presents.
conserve (v) prevent the harmful waste or overuse of a resource
She kept a portion of her paycheck to conserve and save for the future.
splurge (v) spend money freely
He decided to splurge on a new bike.
split up (expression) separate into sections
What’s the best way to split up a paycheck?
divvy out (expression) divide, share
The manager had to divvy out the holiday bonuses to the employees.
file away (expression) put away for storage
She filed away her checks before she could spend them.
break the bank (expression) use up all your money
The new house renovations were close to breaking the bank for the couple.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“If you must have motivation, think of your paycheck on Friday.”
― Noel Coward

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Lifelong Employment

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Businesses should hire employees for their entire lives. Do you agree or disagree? Use specific reasons and examples to support your answer.
    • What are the benefits of hiring employees for their entire lives?
    • What are some negative aspects of hiring employees for their entire lives?
    • What kind of company would you want to work at for your entire life?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have 15 minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
career (n) occupation undertaken for a significant period of time
She had so many careers at one time.
salary (n) fixed payment, wages
He was pleased with the salary that came with the position.
lifelong (adj) lasting or remaining in a particular state throughout a person’s life
She wanted this job to be part of her lifelong career.
stable (adj) not likely to give way
She wanted to work in a stable job where she knew what was expected of her.
affect (v) make a difference
Wherever you work, you can affect positive change.
master (v) acquire complete skill of something
With practice, they could eventually master the process.
bump up (expression) increase
He asked his manager to bump up his wages.
check off (expression) mark something in a list as done
After that experience, she could check off swimming with dolphins on her list.
decide on (expression) choose, select
She couldn’t decide on which career path to take.
work for peanuts (expression) labor for very little money
He felt underappreciated as he worked for peanuts every day.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“Without hard work, nothing grows but weeds.”
― Gordon Hinckley

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Taking Risks vs. Careful Planning

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Some people believe that success in life comes from taking risks or chances. Others believe that success results from careful planning. In your opinion, what does success come from? Use specific reasons and examples to support your answer.
    • In what situations is taking risks a good thing to do?
    • In what situations is careful planning a good thing to do?
    • What method tends to have the best results?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have a 15-minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
provision (n) a thing or amount supplied
We were thankful we had enough provisions to last the weekend.
chance (n) a possibility of something happening
She was afraid that there was a chance of rain.
strategic (adj) referring to long-term goals
He had to be strategic in how he made his next move in their chess game.
precarious (adj) not securely held or positioned
She was in a precarious spot where she had to decide what to do with her money.
jeopardize (v) put something at risk of danger
He asked her not to jeopardize the potential sale.
arrange (v) put in an efficient order
She wanted to arrange her day based on when she could get outside the most.
be after (expression) try to get or find
He always seemed to be after the next goal before the first one finished.
buy into (expression) accept an idea
They had to convince their teacher to buy into their new idea.
feel up to (expression) capable of doing something
He’ll only go if he felt up to driving for several hours.
run the risk (expression) subject oneself to potential danger
Turning the lights off will run the risk of people bumping into each other.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“Be brave. Take risks. Nothing can substitute experience.”
― Paulo Coelho

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.

Judge a Book by Its Cover

Conversation

After a quick greeting, use the following questions as a guideline to form an interesting conversation with your tutor. Feel free to diverge from these suggestions if anything interesting comes up.

  • Do you agree or disagree with the following statement? One should never judge a person by external appearances. Use specific reasons and details to support your answer.
    • In what ways do people judge others by their external appearance?
    • How can those situations have a negative impact?
    • In what ways does judging a person by their external appearance have value?

Vocabulary

Skip this section if you have a 15-minute plan. Read the word/expression and definition out loud, and your tutor will go over anything you do not understand. Practice creating a sentence or two to make sure you know how to use the word/expression properly.

Vocabulary/ Expressions

Expression Definition
prejudice (n) preconceived opinion not based on the fact
She formed a prejudice against him without getting to know him.
appearance (n) the way someone looks
She loved her own appearance so much that she carried a mirror around with her at all times.
external (adj) belonging to the outer surface
They didn’t go in because of the ugly external walls of the building.
shallow (adj) not using serious thought
Since he never put forth an effort, they considered him to be shallow.
conclude (v) arrive at a decision
You need to know the facts before you can conclude something.
predispose (v) make someone inclined to a particular behavior
She was predisposed to like him since he was so nice to her.
frighten away (expression) scare someone off
His grumpiness frightened away the children.
give off (expression) behave in a way that makes others think of you in a certain way
She gave off an unpleasant character of being too uptight.
hold over (expression) have a grudge against someone
She wanted to hold over his previous comments on him.
deck out (expression) dress or decorate in a special way
With the party that evening, the ballroom was decked out in the most beautiful flowers.

Something Extra

Read the following quote out loud.

“Outer beauty pleases the eye. Inner beauty captivates the heart.”
― Mandy Hale

Wrap-up

Go over any new expressions or vocabulary that you learned today.